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Your First Choice for Scratch and Dent Appliances in Charleston

In a day and age where big box stores sell overpriced appliances to hardworking men and women, droves of Americans are flocking to scratch and dent retailers. At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we understand that money doesn’t grow on trees. That’s why we offer our customers the largest selection of overstock and scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina.

Finding a reputable, clean discount appliance store can be challenging. Unfortunately, companies in our industry get a bad rap. Sometimes, they earn it with dingy, poorly-lit stores, empty shelves, and mediocre customer service. At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we are proud to give our customers the “big box” structure of major chains mixed with personable service and affordable pricing of a discount appliance business. Our store is clean, our shelves are stocked, and our staff is ready and waiting to exceed your expectations.

The surge in popularity of scratch and dent appliances might be new, but we are far from a “fly by night” appliance store. As a locally owned and operated appliance store, we have worked very hard to build trust with our customers. We have years of experience selling quality scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina, from washers and dryers to outdoor grills and everything in between. Whether you know the exact brand and appliance you’re looking for or need the assistance of a friendly sales associate, we are here to make your shopping experience seamless and enjoyable!

Customers love Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair because:

When you visit our showroom, you will see a large selection of the following products:

Service Areas

Scratch and Dent Appliances

Ask yourself this: Why should you pay top-dollar prices for brand new “in the box” appliances when you can have them out of the box with the same warranty for a significant amount less? When you begin to think about buying scratch and dent appliances in Charleston, it begins to make all the sense in the world.

Don’t let the term “scratch and dent” scare you – all of our appliances are high-quality, name-brand products that are in great condition. You won’t ever have to worry about an inoperable oven or a faulty dryer when you shop at Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair. Our appliances are all unused and shipped to use straight off the assembly line. That’s right – you’re paying bottom-of-the-barrel prices for brand new products that your family and friends will love.

You might be asking yourself, “What’s the catch?” It might sound too good to be true, but there isn’t any catch. Our scratch and dent appliances are sold at deep discounts because a minor cosmetic issue developed somewhere along the line. A few common reasons why appliances are labeled as scratch and dent include:

Unlike some of our competitors, our skilled technicians perform rigorous multi-point examinations on all our appliances. That way, you can rest easy knowing that your out-of-the-box appliance is ready for regular use as soon as it arrives at your home. With a one-year warranty on most scratch and dent items, our customers leave our showroom with a smile on their face knowing their purchase is protected.

And that, in a nutshell, is the Preferred Appliance Sales and Repairs difference: quality appliances, helpful customer service, and real warranties that you can feel good about.

Scratch and Dent Appliances – Are They Right for You?

Here’s the truth: Nobody wants an old, beat-up appliance with huge dents and scratches. Fortunately, we’re not talking about a banged-up dishwasher that barely works. Scratch and dent appliances are just like brand new, except they have a small nick that’s barely noticeable. The question is, are you OK with a small dent if it means you could save 25% off your purchase? What about 50% off? If you were to do a Google search on a name-brand appliance and compare its price to the same item in our showroom, you would see just how cost-effective scratch and dent shopping can be.

The majority of our customers are savvy shoppers who don’t mind tiny imperfections if it means that they will get a great deal. In many cases, these imperfections are paint-based, which are easily fixed with a little elbow grease. If you’re in the market for a fully functional, nearly-new appliance and don’t mind a small blemish, buying scratch and dent appliances is a great choice that won’t break your bank.

Scratch and Dent Quick Facts​

How to Get the Most Out of Your Scratch and Dent Appliances

Appliances can be a big investment, even if you’re buying them at significant discounts. Of course, you want to keep your appliances in good shape, so they continue working properly for years. Once you buy one of our scratch and dent appliances, keep in mind these tips to keep your new merchandise in great working order:

Clean Inside and Out

All appliances need to be cleaned, even washing machines. As an example, cleaning the coils of your new scratch and dent refrigerator will keep it running efficiently.

Only Use Appliances as They Were Intended

If your kids love to play near your appliances, be sure they aren’t standing or sitting on them. If you’re using a scratch and dent dishwasher or clothes dryer, don’t overload them. If your appliance requires specific products, like a high-efficiency laundry detergent, only use the recommended products.

Change filters

You probably know that clothes drying machines have filters that must be changed. However, other appliances like dishwashers and ice makers can also have filters. Read your appliance’s manual to see if your product has a filter, and if so, how often it needs to be changed.

Overstock Appliances in Charleston

Much like our scratch and dent merchandise, overstock appliances have become incredibly popular in recent times. While many savvy shoppers already know about the deals associated with overstock items, others hear “overstock appliances” and immediately think something is wrong. Nothing could be further from the truth!

There’s a simple explanation for overstock appliances in South Carolina, and it’s right in the name. Overstock items are products that manufacturers have made too many of or have a surplus of stock that needs to be sold. This is great news for shoppers who can get new, brand-name appliances at a fraction of their original cost.

There are many reasons why a manufacturer might need to sell their merchandise as overstock:

While overstock items are perfectly normal, some customers think they aren’t worth purchasing because of a perceived “expiration date.” The fact is, overstock and surplus appliances are common in every industry because inventory management isn’t an easy job. Sometimes people make errors, but those mistakes can turn into amazing opportunities for high-quality appliances at great prices.

Overstock Appliances Explained

Retailers have to deal with surplus merchandise all the time because older stock must be removed to make room for newer appliances. When a retailer has a surplus of a particular appliance, they will typically reach out to the manufacturer to see if they can return their overstocked appliances. Because these manufacturers charge retailers to restock these surplus items, many retailers choose instead to off-load their stock at a discounted price, and that’s where Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair steps in.

The bottom line? Overstock appliances in Charlestonare common, brand new, and waiting for you to check out at our showroom. We carry all the major appliance brand names, like Whirlpool, LG, Bosch, Maytag, Kenmore, and even Samsung. Unlike our scratch and dent products, you aren’t going to find any minor dings or scratches on our overstock appliances. It sounds too good to be true, but it isn’t – when manufacturers make too much, you’re in luck.

At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we have a vast selection of overstock appliances for you to choose from, including:

Buy Scratch and Dent Appliances, Help Save the Environment

Buying overstock or scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina is not just a way to get a great deal on a name-brand product – it’s also a great way to help protect our environment. As you might have guessed, unused scratch and dent merchandise usually end up in a landfill to sit and rot. When these appliances are brought to landfills, they release toxic greenhouse gases and harmful substances as their chemical and metal composition deteriorate.

When you buy a scratch and dent appliance from Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, know that you are doing your part to help protect our environment. When you break it down, buying products and appliances that would otherwise go to a landfill is a win-win. You’re getting an incredible discount on a high-quality appliance and you’re diminishing the harmful greenhouse gases that harm our precious environment.

The Premier Provider of Overstock and Scratch and Dent Appliances in Charleston

If you’re still on the fence about giving scratch and dent products a chance, we encourage you to visit our discount appliance store in Charleston. We have a full selection of appliances for you to see, like refrigerators, washing machines, dishwashers, and microwaves. If you’re looking for it, chances are we have it in stock!

If you have questions or need assistance choosing the right appliance for your home and budget, we’re here to help however possible. Whether you need a detailed rundown of how an appliance works or would like to hear more information about our easy financing options, our team will take the time to answer your questions.

At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, our customers always come first!

Latest News in Charleston

SC artist’s collaborative COVID-19 Together While Apart Project on exhibit tour

Physical separation became an opportunity, not an obstacle, for Seabrook Island artist Deane Bowers. In the midst of the COVID-19 quarantine, while she was brimming with emotions, Bowers began searching for ways to explore and express them creatively. While her own artwork flourished from the bombardment of unexpected inspiration, within her blossomed a desire to collaborate with other artists in some capacity, despite not being able to do so in per...

Physical separation became an opportunity, not an obstacle, for Seabrook Island artist Deane Bowers.

In the midst of the COVID-19 quarantine, while she was brimming with emotions, Bowers began searching for ways to explore and express them creatively.

While her own artwork flourished from the bombardment of unexpected inspiration, within her blossomed a desire to collaborate with other artists in some capacity, despite not being able to do so in person.

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She was craving community and began developing an idea.

Bowers, who uses reclaimed and recycled materials for much of her multidimensional artwork, began searching her house for what art supplies she could repurpose for a group project.

When she tried to open her basement door, she was met with a stack of shipping boxes from online purchases. That’s when sparks flew.

“It was like the universe literally threw a box in my way and I was like, OK, there’s your answer,” Bowers said.

She started cutting up boxes into 6-by-6-inch squares, with the hopes to find willing participants she could mail them to who would then use them as their canvases.

The goal was to compile the resulting artwork together into somewhat of a cardboard patchwork quilt.

She called the idea the Together While Apart Art Project, and the finished piece is currently being considered for permanent exhibit by the Medical University of South Carolina and McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina.

“I knew from my own journey as an artist that by processing these events going on in our world, my creativity would help me channel them and I’d start healing myself and finding hope,” Bowers said. “I felt like that would be the case with other people.”

Bowers reached out on all the platforms she had access to, including on her social media pages and during a podcast interview with a Los Angeles-based artist she knew. She wanted to find participants both in and outside of the Lowcountry.

“I really wanted to find a community of people who wanted to be a part of something bigger than themselves,” Bowers said.

From late July until early October, she garnered interest from more than 30 artists across the country that were then whittled down to 19 from eight different states, as some dropped out while other obligations arose.

Bowers sent everyone two to three pieces of a box and told them to think outside the box.

“I wanted them to process whatever they were feeling, positive or negative, and told them to put that into art,” Bowers said.

Meanwhile, she began getting to know the artists who had reached out for the project.

She learned that though in Cleveland, Amy Lauria had a shared love of coastal art, made from her collection of stones, driftwood and beach glass from the shores of Lake Erie.

She discovered Statesville, N.C., participant Cynthia Webb was primarily a jeweler, not a painter, but was still willing to give the project a whirl.

She checked on California participants Nikki Contini and Rebecca Potts during the wildfires.

Everyone began chatting on social media, expressing their hardships during the pandemic and also offering support and encouraging words.

Then Bowers paired up snail mail buddies, sending everyone in the group a pre-stamped envelope biweekly that they could fill with whatever they wanted to send to their selected partner.

In the midst of widespread loss of life, Bowers saw before her eyes a story unfold of new friendships being born despite it all.

“We really became this socially distanced community, connected over this project,” Bowers said. “We all were sheltering in home and in the same pandemic boat, but took comfort in knowing we weren’t in it alone.”

In January, the last finished squares arrived on Seabrook Island.

“When I laid all the squares out on my studio table, I saw that everyone had channeled their heartache, their loneliness, their sadness, their anxiety, all into something positive,” Bowers said. “The synergy was wild.”

Frankie Slaughter’s abstract acrylic and Celie Gehrig’s colorful flowers were bright and childlike splashes of wonder amid the chaos.

Rachel McLaughlin’s piece “No Mud, No Lotus” (Thich Nhat Hanh) perhaps encapsulated the juxtaposition of positive and negative emotions brought on by COVID-19 the most succinctly.

“It’s a reminder that happiness always goes hand-in-hand with struggle and suffering,” she penned. “One cannot exist without the other.”

Charleston participant Cathy Kleiman painted angels in hopes that everyone would have a COVID-19 protector watching over them. But those angels also represented guardians watching over Black Lives Matter demonstrators as they marched for justice.

“I wanted to express that every Black, Brown, White person — whatever race, creed, color or sexual orientation — needed guardian angels watching over them during this time for unity, peace, love, justice, mercy and understanding,” Kleiman said.

After Bowers compiled the separate squares into one finished piece, she began offering it as a traveling exhibit to different galleries, museums and hospitals around the country.

The first to showcase it will be the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Institute for Arts in Medicine.

“Part of our mission is to enhance the healing environment, and we truly feel this piece will do just that,” said program coordinator Lauren Edwards.

The Together While Apart Art Project will be in Alabama until December and then will travel to the Hickory Museum of Art in North Carolina for six months before arriving at the Medical College of Virginia.

It could end up in Charleston, a notion supported by the South Carolina Arts Commission. Community Arts Development Director Susan DuPlessis expressed the importance of reflections such as this on eras of hardship.

“What especially stands out for me is the idea that community could be created in 6-by-6-inch squares,” DuPlessis said. “It took an artist with a vision who said ‘why not?’ And she went for it. Now, her idea and the creative work of a number of artists who don’t know each other has been stitched together — literally and figuratively.”

Bowers said she wouldn’t mind the project traveling a little longer and heading out to the West Coast before settling down.

She hopes that along with a message of hope it also conveys a powerful revelation she hadn’t expected to discover during the pandemic: You can find and create your own community even if you can’t see them face to face.

“Together, even if apart, we’re better,” she said.

Thursday marks 6 years since Charleston church shooting

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Six years ago Thursday, gunfire erupted inside Mother Emanuel AME Church in downtown Charleston. The shooting happened during the final prayer at the end of a Wednesday night Bible study and claimed nine lives, including the church’s senior pastor: A virtual forgiveness forum is scheduled for Thursday night from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The online event is designed to give attendees the chance to hear from family and church members as well as a survivor “as they reflect on the meaning of “fo...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Six years ago Thursday, gunfire erupted inside Mother Emanuel AME Church in downtown Charleston.

The shooting happened during the final prayer at the end of a Wednesday night Bible study and claimed nine lives, including the church’s senior pastor:

A virtual forgiveness forum is scheduled for Thursday night from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The online event is designed to give attendees the chance to hear from family and church members as well as a survivor “as they reflect on the meaning of “forgiveness, reconciliation and social justice as it relates to healing,” the event’s page states.

Click here to register for the event.

Mother Emanuel AME is also holding a virtual worship service Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. The service will celebrate not only Father’s Day but will also include a remembrance of the nine victims.

The Mother Emanuel Memorial Foundation Board announced Wednesday a $2 million donation from the city of Charleston. That money will help fund the memorial’s construction and the foundation’s social justice programs and initiatives.

A release from the foundation describes the design of the memorial, which will be installed on the grounds of the church and include a courtyard with two fellowship benches.

“At the center of the courtyard, the curves of the benches encircle a marble fountain where the names of the Emanuel Nine are carved around the fountain’s edge,” the release states. “Water emanates from a cross-shaped source, filling the basin and gently spilling over the names of the nine. The opening between the benches toward the back of the courtyard reveals a cross above a simple altar, providing visitors a quiet place to linger in thought and prayer.”

“When complete, this project will stand not only as a memorial to the victims of this horrific tragedy but as a daily call to action for all our citizens,” Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg said. “It will inspire us, just as the victims’ families and survivors have for the past six years, to continue moving forward together to make Charleston a more just and equitable place for all.”

The memorial will honor the nine victims as well as five survivors of the shooting. A survivor’s garden will be surrounded by six stone benches and five trees. The sixth signifies that the church itself is also a survivor of the tragedy, the release states.

“Ever since June 17, 2015, the City of Charleston has stood by the families of the Emanuel Nine, the Survivors, and the members of Mother Emanuel AME Church,” Mother Emanuel AME’s pastor and memorial foundation co-chair, the Rev. Eric Manning said. “We are truly thankful for their support for the last six years and are humbled by their contribution to the Mother Emanuel Memorial foundation. Their contribution will ensure that the memory of the Emanuel Nine will never be forgotten, the resilience and strength of the Survivors will continue to be celebrated, and the messages of forgiveness, love and grace will draw all people together.”

Groundbreaking on the memorial is expected in the fall and organizers expect it to open in mid to late 2022.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

MUSC receives funding to research vaping in adolescents

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Medical University of South Carolina has received funding from the federal government to develop a smartphone app designed to help adolescents quit vaping. MUSC’s Hollings Cancer Center says researchers have found most adolescents want to stop vaping. They say the challenge is how to support them in dropping an addictive behavior. For many young people, doctors say healthily coping with depression is key. MUSC College of Medicine Assistant Professor Dr. Jennifer Dahne says she recently...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Medical University of South Carolina has received funding from the federal government to develop a smartphone app designed to help adolescents quit vaping.

MUSC’s Hollings Cancer Center says researchers have found most adolescents want to stop vaping. They say the challenge is how to support them in dropping an addictive behavior.

For many young people, doctors say healthily coping with depression is key.

MUSC College of Medicine Assistant Professor Dr. Jennifer Dahne says she recently received one of the first grants from the National Institutes of Health aimed at reducing vaping among adolescents.

The National Institutes of Health Small Business Technology Transfer Grant is for $320,000 and researchers say it will help them develop a smartphone app designed to help adolescents quit vaping.

“Most of my research focuses on development of various technology-based interventions. I focus mostly on depression treatment and smoking cessation,” Dahne said. “Those are my interest areas because they affect a lot of people. With my program of research, I think about how we develop interventions, evaluate them and get them out there in a way that really is going to get us the most bang for our buck.”

This trial will further Hollings’ cancer control research program by addressing an issue affecting more and more adolescents. According to previous studies cited in Dahne’s work, the number of adolescents who reported vaping has increased from near zero in 2011 to 27.8% in 2019.

“The idea behind the small business technology transfer grant program is to take tax dollars that we’re paying to NIH’s research portfolio and invest them in research that then is going to move toward products being commercialized and generating revenue that goes back into the economy,” said Dahne.

MUSC’s team is working with the small business MountainPass Technology LLC, to create an app that will address some of the biggest risk factors that may cause adolescents ages 16 to 20 to start, and continue, vaping, researcher say.

Using an app is critical to reaching the targeted age group, Dahne said. “We wanted to do a digital intervention because we know about 98% of this age group is using smartphones really frequently.”

Examining what triggers vaping usage, researchers say they identified one of the biggest risk factors as being depressive symptoms, reported by 36% of adolescent vapers. MUSC says the app will focus on an evidence-based treatment for depression called behavioral activation.

Users will be able to track their successes and accomplishments through the app, and researchers say this will also allow users to see changes in their vaping habits. The app is specifically being created and tested to appeal to younger generations.

Each participant will be enrolled in the trial for four weeks, but Dahne estimates that it will take at least six months to complete the trial. Once complete, researchers say they will measure and compare results with the group who used the app versus those who received traditional primary care treatment.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Former SC telecom exec Lightsey to succeed Hitt as commerce secretary

Former South Carolina telecommunications executive and attorney Harry Lightsey III will be named to lead the state Commerce Department on June 16, people familiar with the decision have told The Post and Courier. Lightsey — who has decades of economic development experience and is currently with Washington, D.C.-based business consultant Hawksbill Advisers — will succeed Bobby Hitt, who has served in the office for more than a decade. Gov. Henry McMaster’s office plans to hold a news conference for 10:30 a.m. ...

Former South Carolina telecommunications executive and attorney Harry Lightsey III will be named to lead the state Commerce Department on June 16, people familiar with the decision have told The Post and Courier.

Lightsey — who has decades of economic development experience and is currently with Washington, D.C.-based business consultant Hawksbill Advisers — will succeed Bobby Hitt, who has served in the office for more than a decade.

Gov. Henry McMaster’s office plans to hold a news conference for 10:30 a.m. to announce a new cabinet-level appointment at the State House.

A Commerce spokeswoman said the agency “defers to the governor’s office, as the secretary is nominated by the governor.” A spokesman for McMaster could not immediately be reached for comment.

Lightsey also could not be reached. The Post and Courier was told he was traveling to Columbia for the morning announcement.

Lightsey spent more than 26 years in the old Bell telephone system and with successor AT&T, including as president of AT&T’s Southeast region and senior vice president of legislative and external affairs. He also served as South Carolina president at BellSouth Telecommunications as it was breaking into the long-distance business in the Palmetto State.

Before joining Hawksbill, he was director of emerging technologies policy in the General Motors Global Public Policy organization as the automaker was developing its first autonomous vehicles. He also led GM’s federal affairs team and was a former member of the board of directors for the Federal Reserve Bank in Richmond, Va.

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In addition, Lightsey has worked to improve technology research at the state’s colleges, developed long-range planning for the S.C. Chamber of Commerce and helped the EdVenture children’s museum in Columbia get its start.

Lightsey’s father, Harry Lightsey Jr., was the former president of the College of Charleston, where the younger Lightsey has served as a trustee.

A graduate of Princeton University, where he majored in East Asian studies, Lightsey earned his law degree at the University of South Carolina School of Law. In 2002, he received the Order of the Palmetto, South Carolina’s highest civilian recognition, for his achievements in leading the effort to establish research and development programs in higher education.

Hitt, a former newspaper editor and BMW executive before accepting the Commerce job under former Gov. Nikki Haley, is the state’s longest-serving head of that department. During his tenure, he has helped recruit $43 billion in capital investment and 150,000 jobs, according to agency figures.

Hitt and his staff have landed some of South Carolina’s best-known industries, including tiremakers Michelin and Bridgestone, commercial vehicle manufacturer Mercedes-Benz Vans, appliance industry leader Samsung and the $1.2 billion Volvo Cars campus in Berkeley County.

During an “Inside Business Live” event that The Post and Courier organized in March, Hitt said he has been thinking about retiring for some time.

“When you get to be a certain age, and I’m 71 now, you start looking at the third trimester of life and say, ‘OK, this is a new game here,’” he said. “I know how it ends, so how do I want to apportion my time. So, it’s been on my mind. Ten years is a long time.”

S.C. Stingrays grab early lead in ECHL conference finals

The South Carolina Stingrays showed no ill effects from a quick turnaround in the ECHL playoffs on Wednesday night. After eliminating the top team in the ECHL in a decisive game five victory on June 14 in Florida, the Stingrays returned home to open the Eastern Conference finals with a 5-1 rout of Greenville on June 16 at the Carolina Ice Palace. Andrew Cherniwchan and Max Novak each scored twice as South Carolina took a 1-0 lead in the best-of-five series. The Stingrays will play the next two games at Greenville, starting Frid...

The South Carolina Stingrays showed no ill effects from a quick turnaround in the ECHL playoffs on Wednesday night.

After eliminating the top team in the ECHL in a decisive game five victory on June 14 in Florida, the Stingrays returned home to open the Eastern Conference finals with a 5-1 rout of Greenville on June 16 at the Carolina Ice Palace.

Andrew Cherniwchan and Max Novak each scored twice as South Carolina took a 1-0 lead in the best-of-five series. The Stingrays will play the next two games at Greenville, starting Friday night. If necessary, games four and five will be at the Carolina Ice Palace on June 21 and 23.

The Stingrays dominated the first period with 15 shots on goal to just four for the Swamp Rabbits, and scored twice in a stretch of about two minutes.

South Carolina gained a 5-on-3 power play, bringing on five forwards for the two-man advantage. Novak cashed in quickly, netting a rebound off a shot from Cole Ully for a 1-0 lead at 11:58 of the first, with Dan DeSalvo also getting an assist.

Novak with a PP goal and gives life to the Rays! pic.twitter.com/QVgYR1FLgp

— X - SC Stingrays (@SCStingrays) June 16, 2021

That was followed shortly by a goal from Dylan Steman in a 2-on-1 break with Tariq Hammond, Steman going high with his shot for a 2-0 lead at 14:14 of the first. Mark Cooper also was credited with an assist.

Cherniwchan bounced the puck off the foot of a Swamp Rabbits defender and into the net for a 3-0 lead early in the second period, the power play goal assisted by Matthew Weis and Max Gottlieb.

The rout was on when Cherniwchan scored his second goal, deflecting a shot from Tyler Nanne into net with 6:49 left in the second, forcing the Swamp Rabbits to bench starting goalie Ryan Bednard.

— X - SC Stingrays (@SCStingrays) June 17, 2021

Greenville finally got on the board in the third period when Graham Knott scored with 13:34 left in the game, but Novak answered with an empty-net goal in the final minutes.

South Carolina is now 2-1 in its home away from home, the Carolina Ice Palace, and is guaranteed at least one more game in their practice facility. The Stingrays’ usual home, the North Charleston Coliseum, is not available for the postseason after the ECHL regular season was delayed by the coronavirus pandemic. The Coliseum had been previously booked for other events.

The Stingrays eliminated the top-seeded Florida Everblades with a 3-2 victory in game five of that series on June 14. South Carolina is in the ECHL playoffs for the 27th time in 28 seasons, and is aiming for its fourth Kelly Cup title and first since 2009.

Fort Wayne and Allen are battling in the Western Conference finals, and will begin their series on June 18.

Reach Jeff Hartsell at 843-937-5596. Follow on Twitter @Jeff_fromthePC

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