Scratch and Dent

Appliances in Cottageville

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843-970-8033 1992 Old Trolley Rd. Summerville, SC 29485

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Your First Choice for Scratch and Dent Appliances in Cottageville

In a day and age where big box stores sell overpriced appliances to hardworking men and women, droves of Americans are flocking to scratch and dent retailers. At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we understand that money doesn’t grow on trees. That’s why we offer our customers the largest selection of overstock and scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina.

Finding a reputable, clean discount appliance store can be challenging. Unfortunately, companies in our industry get a bad rap. Sometimes, they earn it with dingy, poorly-lit stores, empty shelves, and mediocre customer service. At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we are proud to give our customers the “big box” structure of major chains mixed with personable service and affordable pricing of a discount appliance business. Our store is clean, our shelves are stocked, and our staff is ready and waiting to exceed your expectations.

The surge in popularity of scratch and dent appliances might be new, but we are far from a “fly by night” appliance store. As a locally owned and operated appliance store, we have worked very hard to build trust with our customers. We have years of experience selling quality scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina, from washers and dryers to outdoor grills and everything in between. Whether you know the exact brand and appliance you’re looking for or need the assistance of a friendly sales associate, we are here to make your shopping experience seamless and enjoyable!

Customers love Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair because:

  • All of our scratch and dent or overstock appliances are in great condition, giving you years of reliable use
  • We only sell the best name brand scratch and dent appliances
  • We offer a one-year warranty on many products
  • We have the most competitive prices in South Carolina
  • Our customers always come first!

When you visit our showroom, you will see a large selection of the following products:

Service Areas

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Scratch and Dent Appliances

Ask yourself this: Why should you pay top-dollar prices for brand new “in the box” appliances when you can have them out of the box with the same warranty for a significant amount less? When you begin to think about buying scratch and dent appliances in Cottageville, it begins to make all the sense in the world.

Don’t let the term “scratch and dent” scare you – all of our appliances are high-quality, name-brand products that are in great condition. You won’t ever have to worry about an inoperable oven or a faulty dryer when you shop at Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair. Our appliances are all unused and shipped to use straight off the assembly line. That’s right – you’re paying bottom-of-the-barrel prices for brand new products that your family and friends will love.

You might be asking yourself, “What’s the catch?” It might sound too good to be true, but there isn’t any catch. Our scratch and dent appliances are sold at deep discounts because a minor cosmetic issue developed somewhere along the line. A few common reasons why appliances are labeled as scratch and dent include:

  • The product’s external packaging was slightly damaged
  • The product has a small scratch that is barely visible
  • The product has a slight dent that is hard to see
  • The product has a tiny “ding” from being moved around in the warehouse
Service Areas

Unlike some of our competitors, our skilled technicians perform rigorous multi-point examinations on all our appliances. That way, you can rest easy knowing that your out-of-the-box appliance is ready for regular use as soon as it arrives at your home. With a one-year warranty on most scratch and dent items, our customers leave our showroom with a smile on their face knowing their purchase is protected.

And that, in a nutshell, is the Preferred Appliance Sales and Repairs difference: quality appliances, helpful customer service, and real warranties that you can feel good about.

refrezarator

Scratch and Dent Appliances – Are They Right for You?

Here’s the truth: Nobody wants an old, beat-up appliance with huge dents and scratches. Fortunately, we’re not talking about a banged-up dishwasher that barely works. Scratch and dent appliances are just like brand new, except they have a small nick that’s barely noticeable. The question is, are you OK with a small dent if it means you could save 25% off your purchase? What about 50% off? If you were to do a Google search on a name-brand appliance and compare its price to the same item in our showroom, you would see just how cost-effective scratch and dent shopping can be.

The majority of our customers are savvy shoppers who don’t mind tiny imperfections if it means that they will get a great deal. In many cases, these imperfections are paint-based, which are easily fixed with a little elbow grease. If you’re in the market for a fully functional, nearly-new appliance and don’t mind a small blemish, buying scratch and dent appliances is a great choice that won’t break your bank.

Scratch and Dent Quick Facts

  • Scratch and dent doesn’t mean “damaged.” You could save as much as 50% or more off brand new appliances with minor scrapes or dents.
  • We have a huge selection of scratch and dent appliances for sale, including washing machines, dryers, refrigerators, stoves, and much more.
  • Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair offers customers all major name brands in our industry, including Samsung, LG, Whirlpool, Kenmore, Speed Queen, Maytag, Bosch, Frigidaire, and more.
  • Each of our scratch and dent appliances is examined before you buy to ensure they work properly.
  • We offer customers a one-year warranty on most scratch and dent appliances in Cottageville, so you can shop with confidence.
  • There is no credit needed to make a purchase at Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair. In fact, we offer up to $5,000 in approvals and can make arrangements for 90-day payment options.
  • We offer appliance delivery and repair options. We only charge $99 for in-home service calls!
Scratch and Dent Quick Facts

How to Get the Most Out of Your Scratch and Dent Appliances

Appliances can be a big investment, even if you’re buying them at significant discounts. Of course, you want to keep your appliances in
good shape, so they continue working properly for years. Once you buy one of our scratch and dent appliances, keep in mind these tips
to keep your new merchandise in great working order:

Clean Inside and Out

All appliances need to be cleaned, even washing machines. As an example, cleaning the coils of your new scratch and dent refrigerator will keep it running efficiently.

baby-solid
Only Use Appliances as They Were Intended

If your kids love to play near your appliances, be sure they aren’t standing or sitting on them. If you’re using a scratch and dent dishwasher or clothes dryer, don’t overload them. If your appliance requires specific products, like a high-efficiency laundry detergent, only use the recommended products.

Change filters

You probably know that clothes drying machines have filters that must be changed. However, other appliances like dishwashers and ice makers can also have filters. Read your appliance’s manual to see if your product has a filter, and if so, how often it needs to be changed.

home appllience

Overstock Appliances in Cottageville

Much like our scratch and dent merchandise, overstock appliances have become incredibly popular in recent times. While many savvy shoppers already know about the deals associated with overstock items, others hear “overstock appliances” and immediately think something is wrong. Nothing could be further from the truth!

There’s a simple explanation for overstock appliances in South Carolina, and it’s right in the name. Overstock items are products that manufacturers have made too many of or have a surplus of stock that needs to be sold. This is great news for shoppers who can get new, brand-name appliances at a fraction of their original cost.

There are many reasons why a manufacturer might need to sell their merchandise as overstock:

  • A retail store closes its doors, and its appliances and other stock must be liquidated
  • A retail store has an item that doesn’t sell as well as they had hoped
  • The manufacturer or their partners overestimated the amount of stock that they needed

While overstock items are perfectly normal, some customers think they aren’t worth purchasing because of a perceived “expiration date.” The fact is, overstock and surplus appliances are common in every industry because inventory management isn’t an easy job. Sometimes people make errors, but those mistakes can turn into amazing opportunities for high-quality appliances at great prices.

Overstock Appliances Explained

Retailers have to deal with surplus merchandise all the time because older stock must be removed to make room for newer appliances. When a retailer has a surplus of a particular appliance, they will typically reach out to the manufacturer to see if they can return their overstocked appliances. Because these manufacturers charge retailers to restock these surplus items, many retailers choose instead to off-load their stock at a discounted price, and that’s where Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair steps in.

The bottom line? Overstock appliances in Cottageville are common, brand new, and waiting for you to check out at our showroom. We carry all the major appliance brand names, like Whirlpool, LG, Bosch, Maytag, Kenmore, and even Samsung. Unlike our scratch and dent products, you aren’t going to find any minor dings or scratches on our overstock appliances. It sounds too good to be true, but it isn’t – when manufacturers make too much, you’re in luck.

At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we have a vast selection of overstock appliances for you to choose from, including:

  • Microwaves
  • Washers
  • Dryers
  • Refrigerators
  • Stoves
  • TVs
  • Dishwashers
  • Much More!
Overstock Appliances-Explained
Help Save the Environment

Buy Scratch And Dent Appliances, Help Save The Environment

Buying overstock or scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina is not just a way to get a great deal on a name-brand product – it’s also a great way to help protect our environment. As you might have guessed, unused scratch and dent merchandise usually end up in a landfill to sit and rot. When these appliances are brought to landfills, they release toxic greenhouse gases and harmful substances as their chemical and metal composition deteriorate.

When you buy a scratch and dent appliance from Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, know that you are doing your part to help protect our environment. When you break it down, buying products and appliances that would otherwise go to a landfill is a win-win. You’re getting an incredible discount on a high-quality appliance and you’re diminishing the harmful greenhouse gases that harm our precious environment.

The Premier Provider of Overstock and Scratch and Dent Appliances in Cottageville

If you’re still on the fence about giving scratch and dent products a chance, we encourage you to visit our discount appliance store in Cottageville. We have a full selection of appliances for you to see, like refrigerators, washing machines, dishwashers, and microwaves. If you’re looking for it, chances are we have it in stock!

If you have questions or need assistance choosing the right appliance for your home and budget, we’re here to help however possible. Whether you need a detailed rundown of how an appliance works or would like to hear more information about our easy financing options, our team will take the time to answer your questions.

charleston

At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, our customers always come first!

Latest News in Cottageville

Young facing Johnson and Cavazzoni in fight for city’s top leadership seat

Voters in multiple towns and cities are going to the polls next week to choose new leaders, as several towns and cities are holding individual municipal elections.Perhaps the biggest seat up for grabs among these contests is that of mayor for the City of Walterboro: longtime incumbent Walterboro Mayor Bill Young is facing challengers Chrissy Johnson and Alex Cavazzoni in the upcoming Nov. 2nd election.(Please see separate section on these candidates inside this week’s issue).Besides time served in public office, th...

Voters in multiple towns and cities are going to the polls next week to choose new leaders, as several towns and cities are holding individual municipal elections.

Perhaps the biggest seat up for grabs among these contests is that of mayor for the City of Walterboro: longtime incumbent Walterboro Mayor Bill Young is facing challengers Chrissy Johnson and Alex Cavazzoni in the upcoming Nov. 2nd election.

(Please see separate section on these candidates inside this week’s issue).

Besides time served in public office, the largest differences among the candidates is what they would do if elected as mayor.

Johnson says she wants to focus in increasing homeless shelters, drug assistance programs and overall economic development in the city.

Young said he wants to complete ongoing projects happening in the city, which include water and sewer expansions and updates, improving drainage in and around Ireland Creek and finishing the more than decade-long beautification project, which has improved signage, lighting and the overall aesthetics of the city’s downtown area and its exits from Interstate 95.

Cavazzoni said that instead of focusing on specific projects or goals in the city, he wants to focus on a movement that encourages residents and newcomers to focus on life in Walterboro: “live here, work here, play here.”

This movement, as he calls it in his campaign, would increase recreational opportunities, including the construction of a public pool and create a swim class program; offer incentives for new businesses to locate in Walterboro; and provide more affordable housing and educational opportunities for residents.

In addition to the mayoral ballot, registered voters can also vote for city council: Walterboro City Council candidates are incumbents Carl Brown, Greg Pryor and James Broderick.

There were no new candidates who filed for city council.

In other election news:

Cottageville

Three people will be running for open seats on Cottageville Town Council. These candidates are Walter “Will” Williams, who is running to fill an unexpired term on council; Elizabeth Green, who is running for town council; and Jay McGrew, who is also running for town council.

This is a non-partisan election, meaning there is no political affiliation for any candidate.

The Cottageville Town Council election will be held on Nov. 2nd.

Smoaks

In Smoaks, the filing deadline has passed and there are two people running for Smoaks Town Council – Jimmy Avant and William Ty Barnes.

This is a non-partisan election. The Smoaks election will be held on Nov. 2nd.

Lodge

In Lodge, two people are running against each other in hopes of becoming the town’s next mayor. Candidates Larry Carter, Sr. and Richard Christopher Smith have both filed to run for mayor. Candidates who have filed to run for Lodge Town Council are Brenda Connelly, E. Richard “Bo” Ryan, Rose S. Varnadoe and Christy C. Terry.

The Lodge election for mayor and for town council will be held on Nov. 2nd.

Edisto Beach

Only one person in Edisto Beach will be on the ballot for the town’s upcoming special mayoral election. Crawford Moore is the sole candidate seeking the town’s mayoral spot.

Moore, who is also the town’s current interim mayor, will fill a two-year spot left on the seat’s four-year term. The current two-year vacancy was created when former Mayor Jane Darby resigned on August 5th, leaving two years into the four-year term.

Additionally, Edisto Beach has two open seats for its town council. Filing for these council seats has ended, and the candidates who have filed to run for these two council seats are James “Jay” R. Watts II and Robert “Bob” N. Renner.

Other items that may interest you

Walterboro voters have poll location changes in Nov. 2nd elections

Some polling locations in Walterboro have temporarily changed for the upcoming municipal election.Two former precincts in Walterboro – Walterboro No. 4 and Walterboro No. 5 – have combined, sending voters from these two precincts to the Colleton County School District headquarters to cast their ballots on the Nov. 2nd.Formerly, voters from Walterboro No. 4 used Forest Hills Elementary School as a precinct location and voters in Walterboro No. 5 used Colleton County Middle School. Now, the school district headquarter...

Some polling locations in Walterboro have temporarily changed for the upcoming municipal election.

Two former precincts in Walterboro – Walterboro No. 4 and Walterboro No. 5 – have combined, sending voters from these two precincts to the Colleton County School District headquarters to cast their ballots on the Nov. 2nd.

Formerly, voters from Walterboro No. 4 used Forest Hills Elementary School as a precinct location and voters in Walterboro No. 5 used Colleton County Middle School. Now, the school district headquarters is the go-to spot for voters from Walterboro Precincts 4 and 5.

Because of a miscommunication with the school district regarding this year’s election, schools are open on this year’s election date. Next year, local voting officials anticipate that schools will be closed for the November election, allowing schools to once again be used as a poll site.

Absentee in person begins Monday, October 4.

On this election-day ballot is current and longtime Mayor Bill Young, who is being opposed by mayoral candidates Chrissy Johnson and Alex Cavazzori.

Voters will also be choosing city council candidates in the Nov. 2nd Walterboro municipal election. City council candidates are incumbents Carl Brown, Greg Pryor and James Broderick.

Walterboro is one of several municipalities in Colleton County that are holding elections on Nov. 2nd. Please see below for the full list of formal candidates that have filed to run in each of these towns.

Each of these municipalities will hold their respective elections on November 2nd. The elections are non-partisan, meaning there is no political affiliation on the ballot.

Any run-off elections for these municipalities will be held two weeks after the election on Tuesday, November 16, 2021.

Cottageville

In Cottageville, two candidates have officially filed to run for town council - Elizabeth A. Green and Jay W. McGrew. Only one candidate – Walter “Will” Williams, Jr. – has filed to run for an unexpired council term.

Election Day voting will be held at the Cottageville Elementary School, located at 648 Peirce Road in Cottageville.

Lodge

In Lodge, two people have filed to run for the town’s mayoral seat: Larry M. Carter, Sr. and Richard C. Smith. Candidates who have filed to run for Lodge Town Council are Brenda Connelly, E. Richard “Bo” Ryan, Rose S. Varnadoe and Christy C. Terry.

Election Day voting will be held at the Colleton County Fire-Rescue Station No. 3, located at 8667 Lodge Highway in Lodge. The poll opens at 7:00 a.m. at this location on election day and will remain open until 7:00 p.m.

Smoaks

In Smoaks, two people have filed to seek a seat on town council: James C. “Jimmy” Avant, Jr. and William “Ty” Barnes.

Election Day voting in Smoaks will be held at the Colleton County Fire-Rescue Station No. 7, located at 27250 Lowcountry Highway in Smoaks.

The poll opens at 7:00 a.m. and will remain open until 7:00 p.m.

Only people who live within the town limits of Smoaks can run for office.

Edisto Beach

Edisto Beach has two open seats for its town council. Filing for these council seats has ended, and the candidates who have filed to run for these two council seats are James “Jay” R. Watts II and Robert “Bob” N. Renner.

Only one candidate has filed to run for the town’s mayoral seat and that is current interim mayor Crawford Moore, who was appointed to fill the term of longtime Mayor Jane Darby, who resigned mid-term earlier this year on August 5th.

The Edisto election will happen at Edisto Beach Town Hall, located at 2414 Murray Street at Edisto Beach. The polls will be opened at 7:00 a.m. and will close at 7 p.m. This is a non-partisan election and no party affiliation shall be placed on the ballot.

Registering to Vote

Any resident who wants to vote in an upcoming election and who is not yet registered to vote can do so now. The voter registration deadline for these elections Oct. 3rd.

To register, visit the Voter Registration & Elections Office at 2471 Jefferies Hwy, Walterboro, SC 29488 or register online at www.scVotes.gov.

Voter registration by mail applications will be accepted if postmarked by Monday, October 4.

Absentee ballots may be requested now from the Colleton County Voter Registration and Elections Office by calling 843-549-2842. Anyone wanting to cast their absentee ballot in person can do this beginning Monday, Oct. 4th by going to local Voter Registration & Elections Office, which is located at 2471 Jefferies Highway in Walterboro. Absentee ballots done in person will continue from October 4 until 5:00 p.m. on the day before the election.

The elections office is open Monday-Friday, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Four Colleton towns to hold elections

Filing is open for candidates who want to run for elected seats for several different towns in Colleton County. Four towns in Colleton County are each holding their own municipal elections on Tuesday, Nov. 2nd: The towns of Smoaks, Cottageville, Lodge and Edisto Beach. Filing for candidates in each of these elections begins on noon on Monday, August 9th and runs through noon until Monday, August 23rd.Smoaks The Smoaks General Election will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 2nd for electing two town council members. This is a...

Filing is open for candidates who want to run for elected seats for several different towns in Colleton County. Four towns in Colleton County are each holding their own municipal elections on Tuesday, Nov. 2nd: The towns of Smoaks, Cottageville, Lodge and Edisto Beach. Filing for candidates in each of these elections begins on noon on Monday, August 9th and runs through noon until Monday, August 23rd.

Smoaks The Smoaks General Election will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 2nd for electing two town council members. This is a non-partisan election, meaning there is no political affiliation on the ballot. Filing for candidates opens at noon on Monday, August 9th and runs until noon on Monday, August 23rd. There is no filing fee. Anyone wanting to file for a seat should go to the Voter Registration and Elections Office, located at 2471 Jefferies Highway in Walterboro. Election Day voting in Smoaks will be held at the Colleton County Fire-Rescue Station No. 7, located at 27250 Lowcountry Highway in Smoaks. The poll opens at 7:00 a.m. and will remain open until 7:00 p.m. Only people who live within the town limits of Smoaks can run for office.

Lodge In Lodge, the town’s election for a mayor and two council members will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 2nd. This is a non-partisan election. Interested candidates should go to the county’s Voter Registration and Elections Office, located at 2471 Jefferies Highway in Walterboro. Filing for candidates opens at noon on Monday, August 9th and run through noon on Monday, August. 23rd. There is a $15 filing fee for this election. Election Day voting will be held at the Colleton County Fire-Rescue Station No. 3, located at 8667 Lodge Highway in Lodge. The poll opens at 7:00 a.m. at this location on election day and will remain open until 7:00 p.m.

Edisto Beach The Town of Edisto Beach will hold its election on Tuesday, Nov. 2nd to elect two new council members. Each council member will serve a four-year term. This election will also be for a mayor to finish two years on a current four-year term: current Mayor Jane Darby resigned from her post on August 5th. (See related story in this issue). Candidates in the Edisto Beach election are nominated by petition. Each council candidate wanting to run for a council seat must complete a petition: a petition must contain the signature of at least five percent of the qualified registered voters in the town. Information on the mayoral special election is not yet available, as of press deadline. Filing for Edisto Beach Town Council candidates opened on August 2nd. The petition must be filed with the Town Clerk by noon on August 19th. Petition forms may be acquired from Town Hall or online at scvotes.gov. Also, candidates must file Statement of Economic Interest forms, which are also found online at www.ethics.sc.gov. The Edisto election will happen at Edisto Beach Town Hall, located at 2414 Murray Street at Edisto Beach. The polls will be opened at 7:00 a.m. and will close at 7 p.m. This is a non-partisan election and no party affiliation shall be placed on the ballot.

Cottageville The non-partisan Cottageville municipal election will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 2nd and is for the election of two council members: one council member has a term ending in 2025 and the other is for an unexpired term that ends in 2023. Anyone desiring to be a candidate for Cottageville Town Council may file at the Cottageville Town Hall, located at 72 Salley Ackerman Drive in Cottageville. Filing opens at noon Monday, August 9, 2021 until noon Monday, August 23, 2021. There is a $50 filing fee for the Cottageville election. Election Day voting will be held at the Cottageville Elementary School, located at 648 Peirce Road in Cottageville. The poll opens at 7:00 a.m. on election day and will remain open until 7:00 p.m.

Any run-off elections for these municipalities will be held two weeks after the election on Tuesday, November 16, 2021.

Candidate Information Candidates wanting to run in any of these municipal elections should begin filing their required state forms. These forms are required, in addition to any filing fees that might be required by the individual municipalities. To obtain the ‘Nonpartisan Statement of Intention of Candidacy’ form, candidates should go to www.scVotes.gov/candidate_information then select ‘Filing for Municipal or other Nonpartisan Offices’. Copies of this form are also at the county’s voter registration office. All candidates must also file the ‘Statement of Economic Interest’ and ‘Campaign Disclosure’ forms with the State Ethics Commission. These forms must be completed online at www.ethics.sc.gov.

Registering to Vote Any resident who wants to vote in an upcoming election and who is not yet registered to vote can do so now. The voter registration deadline for these elections Oct. 3rd. To register, visit the Voter Registration & Elections Office at 2471 Jefferies Hwy, Walterboro, SC 29488 or register online at www.scVotes.gov. Voter registration by mail applications will be accepted if postmarked by Monday, October 4. Absentee ballots may be requested now from the Colleton County Voter Registration and Elections Office by calling 843-549-2842. Anyone wanting to cast their absentee ballot in person can do this beginning Monday, Oct. 4th by going to local Voter Registration & Elections Office, which is located at 2471 Jefferies Highway in Walterboro. Absentee ballots done in person will continue from October 4 until 5:00 p.m. on the day before the election. The elections office is open Monday-Friday, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Cottageville gun ordinance hearing yields confusion, unanswered questions

COTTAGEVILLE, SC (WCIV) — A lot of confusion and unanswered questions stemmed from Tuesday night's public hearing on gun ordinances in the town of Cottageville.Mayor Tim Grimsley said he called the emergency meeting because of possible gun ordinance changes that he said were causing confusion in the town.The mayor said the meeting was held to address rumors he felt were causing confusion in the town. Even though that was the goal of the night, many people left with concerns about the wording of their gun laws.There...

COTTAGEVILLE, SC (WCIV) — A lot of confusion and unanswered questions stemmed from Tuesday night's public hearing on gun ordinances in the town of Cottageville.

Mayor Tim Grimsley said he called the emergency meeting because of possible gun ordinance changes that he said were causing confusion in the town.

The mayor said the meeting was held to address rumors he felt were causing confusion in the town. Even though that was the goal of the night, many people left with concerns about the wording of their gun laws.

There was only standing room by the start of the meeting at Cottageville Town Hall. The Mayor said the town could change the language of the current ordinance.

“Pellet rifles, slingshots, or other devices — we changed the word other device to other firearms. Somehow that got misconstrued,” said Grimsley.

He said this word change would only clarify the current laws that are in place.

“It got all turned around that we are trying to infringe on people’s Second Amendment rights,” said Grimsley.

Grimsley explained that there is no need for an open carry on town property, including the park next door.

“We are not trying to limit or take anything away. We just want you to be safe and use commons sense. Unfortunately, common sense is out of the window nowadays.”

However, some people in the crowd don’t think a word swap will do the job. Gerald Grenier said he owns a gun for protection and wants better protection from town leaders.

“It’s not that I am against what they are trying to do. It’s just that they need to incorporate the laws that exist to do it,” said Grenier.

John Dodson said he isn’t a gun owner but still wants more transparency from officials.

“I think it’s a step forward to something else. Or else they wouldn’t change it in the first place,” said Dodson.

It’s a change some believe could be the difference between life or death.

“When you are dead it’s too late. People can smile and say well at least you weren’t carrying a firearm. But you’re dead. You are dead because you couldn’t defend yourself,” said Grenier.

The Mayor clarified that the potential changes would only apply to the town's property such as town hall, not everywhere in town limits.

Grimsley wasn’t able to give a timeline on when any changes to the ordinance could happen. Grimsley explained that he doesn’t expect any changes to be made.

The emergency meeting comes on the heels of the last Cottageville Town Meeting where the proposed ordinance was announced.

Horses endangered in Colleton with positive cases of EEE and West Nile

The contagious Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus has once again been found in Colleton County, with one horse testing positive for the disease in rural Colleton County and another horse testing positive for West Nile virus. The location of the positive case of EEE is not being disclosed, at the request of the horse owner. The positive case of the West Nile virus in a horse is in Cottageville. Local animal control officials say they are hoping to stop the virus in the entire county by providing additional mosquito spraying: the E...

The contagious Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus has once again been found in Colleton County, with one horse testing positive for the disease in rural Colleton County and another horse testing positive for West Nile virus. The location of the positive case of EEE is not being disclosed, at the request of the horse owner. The positive case of the West Nile virus in a horse is in Cottageville. Local animal control officials say they are hoping to stop the virus in the entire county by providing additional mosquito spraying: the EEE virus is commonly spread through mosquitoes. “There has been one EEE and one West Nile virus diagnosis in our county. We are spraying to stop it,” said Laura Clark, director of Colleton County Animal and Environmental Services. “These diseases are sad, but preventable,” said Clark. “Even though a horse has been fully vaccinated, most owners are unaware of the advice from equine vets to vaccinate twice a year for EEE and WNV.” This is the first positive case of EEE and the first positive known case of West Nile in Colleton County this year. However, this isn’t the first time the disease has been found in Colleton and in nearby counties. Clemson confirmed on Aug. 25, 2020, that two cases of horses with EEE had been found: a four-year-old paint mare in Colleton and a two-year-old paint colt in Jasper County. Both horses had to be euthanized. Now, another horse has tested positive for EEE and horse owners have been put on alert. EEE is one of the most dangerous mosquito-transmitted diseases in the U.S. The virus spreads from wild birds to mosquitos. The mosquitos then pass the virus to humans, horses and other birds. Officials at VetMed say that birds are like reservoirs for the virus. Mosquitoes and other biting insects carry the pathogen from infected birds and transmit it to horses when they bite. A horse affected with EEE is not contagious and poses no risk to other horses, humans or birds. The mosquito has to bite an infected bird and then a horse or human to transmit the disease. The virus is the cause of brain infections (encephalitis) in people, horses and other mammals. In people it also causes meningitis, but in horses, it is more deadly. Symptoms in horses include: weakness, staggering gait, unable to stand, depression and anorexia, high fever, lack of appetite, lethargy, drowsiness, hyperexcitability, tremors of the face and neck muscles, convulsions, cranial nerve paralysis, facial paralysis, weakness of the tongue, head tilt, droopy lip, muzzle deviation, incoordination or complete paralysis of one or more limbs, colic, and muscle twitches in neck, flank and shoulders. There is no effective treatment, and horses infected with EEE have a 75 – 95 percent morbidity rate. However, the disease can be prevented in horses with a twice-yearly vaccination. The West Nile Virus (WNV) infection was recently diagnosed in Cottageville in Cassey Spell’s sixteen-month-old Appaloosa mare named “Reba.” “I noticed that Reba had tremors, a quivering lip, walked stiffly, and was weak in her back legs. Her fever spiked at 103.3, and when the vet came, we put her in a stall. Eventually she couldn’t stand at all,” said Spell. The vet took blood and sent it to Clemson, where West Nile was diagnosed, but it took seven days to get the results. Fortunately, the vet had prescribed strong antibiotics to try and get her back on her feet. “For three days, I stayed with her and made a soupy mash for her to eat. Day by day she got a little better, but was able to stand for only 10 minutes at time before she would collapse,” said Spell. “On day three, the vet gave the horse a diuretic to flush the virus, and that seemed to help. Day four she grazed a little and walked for about 30 minutes before she went down. On day five, her tremors were gone, and by day six, she was much better. “On day seven the blood work came back as West Nile,” she said. Spell dumped all water troughs and bleached them, but there was nothing she could do about the puddles of rain water across the farm and along Highway 17A.

“This has been a definite concern, so we contacted the County Animal Services to get help with spraying around the area. We are taking every precaution we can. Oddly enough, we have 12 horses, and this was the only one infected,” Spell said. Symptoms of West Nile may include fever, incoordination, stumbling, falling, weakness, muscle twitching, seizures, drooping lips, lip smacking, head drooping, grinding teeth, and abnormal sensitivity to touch or sound. Serious cases may be unable to rise, and then death.

How to protect your horses and yourself Humans are able to contract these two diseases; therefore, precautions need to be taken to prevent transmission. According to the CDC, use insect repellent, wear long-sleeved shirts and pants, treat clothing and gear, and take steps to control mosquitoes indoors and outdoors to prevent mosquito bites. Get rid of all standing water if possible. Spray for mosquitos outdoors around property. There are environmentally friendly homemade repellents that people can also use. Recipes are found online. For horses, the American Association of Equine Practitioners suggests that horse owners keep all horses up to date on vaccinations. The first initial vaccination is followed in 4 to 6 weeks with a booster, and yearly revaccination is recommended. More frequent boosters twice yearly are recommended in areas with year-round mosquito seasons and in endemic areas such as the Lowcountry.

Mosquito management Practice mosquito management on all properties where horses are kept: -Use insect repellents frequently; re-apply after rain. -Keep horses in at night when possible, and apply insect repellant. -Eliminate or minimize standing water. -Stock tanks or ponds with mosquito-feeding fish. -Eliminate brush piles, gutters, old tires and litter. -Remove all equipment in which standing water can collect.

Mosquito Spraying Schedule in Colleton County In an effort to minimize the mosquito population in the area where the horse was recently infected, Colleton County will be doing a ground spray application of mosquito control product on the following dates, weather permitting. Ground spray will be conducted between the hours of 7:00 p.m. and 1:00 a.m. on Thursday, September 23, 2021; Thursday, October 7, 2021; and Thursday, October 21, 2021. The chemical that will be applied contains Permethrin and Piperonyl Butoxide as the active ingredients. If bee keepers are in the area, they need to notify Animal Services. The following roads/areas in Cottageville will be included in the application: Jacksonboro Road from Griffiths Acres Dr. to Hwy 17A, Amber Court, Dairy Lane, Durant Avenue from Goos Lane to Griffiths Acres Drive, Goos Lane, Nuthatch Lane, Mistletoe Lane, Rehoboth Road from Hwy 17A to Van Dyke Road, Peirce Road from Hwy 17A to Rhode Drive and to Depot Road, Hwy 17A from Depot to 12403 Hwy 17A (Lone Fox Farm), Cottageville Elementary School, Sally Ackerman Drive, Hwy 17A from Joyland Lane to Reevestown Road, Caboose Court, Depot Road, and Clydeville Lane from Hwy 17A to Kennedy Lane, Gatch Lane, Cone Court, Majestic Oak Way, Bama Road from and to Hwy 17A, Farmer Road, blocker Lane, Kim Lane, Miller Willilams Lane, Saint Charles Place, Welch Lane, and Angelic Lane. For questions regarding this program, contact Colleton Animal Services at 843-893-2651, or email ccaec@colletoncounty.org.

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