Scratch and Dent

Appliances in Johns Island

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843-970-8033 1992 Old Trolley Rd. Summerville, SC 29485

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Your First Choice for Scratch and Dent Appliances in Johns Island

In a day and age where big box stores sell overpriced appliances to hardworking men and women, droves of Americans are flocking to scratch and dent retailers. At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we understand that money doesn’t grow on trees. That’s why we offer our customers the largest selection of overstock and scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina.

Finding a reputable, clean discount appliance store can be challenging. Unfortunately, companies in our industry get a bad rap. Sometimes, they earn it with dingy, poorly-lit stores, empty shelves, and mediocre customer service. At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we are proud to give our customers the “big box” structure of major chains mixed with personable service and affordable pricing of a discount appliance business. Our store is clean, our shelves are stocked, and our staff is ready and waiting to exceed your expectations.

The surge in popularity of scratch and dent appliances might be new, but we are far from a “fly by night” appliance store. As a locally owned and operated appliance store, we have worked very hard to build trust with our customers. We have years of experience selling quality scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina, from washers and dryers to outdoor grills and everything in between. Whether you know the exact brand and appliance you’re looking for or need the assistance of a friendly sales associate, we are here to make your shopping experience seamless and enjoyable!

Customers love Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair because:

  • All of our scratch and dent or overstock appliances are in great condition, giving you years of reliable use
  • We only sell the best name brand scratch and dent appliances
  • We offer a one-year warranty on many products
  • We have the most competitive prices in South Carolina
  • Our customers always come first!

When you visit our showroom, you will see a large selection of the following products:

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Scratch and Dent Appliances

Ask yourself this: Why should you pay top-dollar prices for brand new “in the box” appliances when you can have them out of the box with the same warranty for a significant amount less? When you begin to think about buying scratch and dent appliances in Johns Island, it begins to make all the sense in the world.

Don’t let the term “scratch and dent” scare you – all of our appliances are high-quality, name-brand products that are in great condition. You won’t ever have to worry about an inoperable oven or a faulty dryer when you shop at Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair. Our appliances are all unused and shipped to use straight off the assembly line. That’s right – you’re paying bottom-of-the-barrel prices for brand new products that your family and friends will love.

You might be asking yourself, “What’s the catch?” It might sound too good to be true, but there isn’t any catch. Our scratch and dent appliances are sold at deep discounts because a minor cosmetic issue developed somewhere along the line. A few common reasons why appliances are labeled as scratch and dent include:

  • The product’s external packaging was slightly damaged
  • The product has a small scratch that is barely visible
  • The product has a slight dent that is hard to see
  • The product has a tiny “ding” from being moved around in the warehouse
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Unlike some of our competitors, our skilled technicians perform rigorous multi-point examinations on all our appliances. That way, you can rest easy knowing that your out-of-the-box appliance is ready for regular use as soon as it arrives at your home. With a one-year warranty on most scratch and dent items, our customers leave our showroom with a smile on their face knowing their purchase is protected.

And that, in a nutshell, is the Preferred Appliance Sales and Repairs difference: quality appliances, helpful customer service, and real warranties that you can feel good about.

refrezarator

Scratch and Dent Appliances – Are They Right for You?

Here’s the truth: Nobody wants an old, beat-up appliance with huge dents and scratches. Fortunately, we’re not talking about a banged-up dishwasher that barely works. Scratch and dent appliances are just like brand new, except they have a small nick that’s barely noticeable. The question is, are you OK with a small dent if it means you could save 25% off your purchase? What about 50% off? If you were to do a Google search on a name-brand appliance and compare its price to the same item in our showroom, you would see just how cost-effective scratch and dent shopping can be.

The majority of our customers are savvy shoppers who don’t mind tiny imperfections if it means that they will get a great deal. In many cases, these imperfections are paint-based, which are easily fixed with a little elbow grease. If you’re in the market for a fully functional, nearly-new appliance and don’t mind a small blemish, buying scratch and dent appliances is a great choice that won’t break your bank.

Scratch and Dent Quick Facts

  • Scratch and dent doesn’t mean “damaged.” You could save as much as 50% or more off brand new appliances with minor scrapes or dents.
  • We have a huge selection of scratch and dent appliances for sale, including washing machines, dryers, refrigerators, stoves, and much more.
  • Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair offers customers all major name brands in our industry, including Samsung, LG, Whirlpool, Kenmore, Speed Queen, Maytag, Bosch, Frigidaire, and more.
  • Each of our scratch and dent appliances is examined before you buy to ensure they work properly.
  • We offer customers a one-year warranty on most scratch and dent appliances in Johns Island, so you can shop with confidence.
  • There is no credit needed to make a purchase at Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair. In fact, we offer up to $5,000 in approvals and can make arrangements for 90-day payment options.
  • We offer appliance delivery and repair options. We only charge $99 for in-home service calls!
Scratch and Dent Quick Facts

How to Get the Most Out of Your Scratch and Dent Appliances

Appliances can be a big investment, even if you’re buying them at significant discounts. Of course, you want to keep your appliances in
good shape, so they continue working properly for years. Once you buy one of our scratch and dent appliances, keep in mind these tips
to keep your new merchandise in great working order:

Clean Inside and Out

All appliances need to be cleaned, even washing machines. As an example, cleaning the coils of your new scratch and dent refrigerator will keep it running efficiently.

baby-solid
Only Use Appliances as They Were Intended

If your kids love to play near your appliances, be sure they aren’t standing or sitting on them. If you’re using a scratch and dent dishwasher or clothes dryer, don’t overload them. If your appliance requires specific products, like a high-efficiency laundry detergent, only use the recommended products.

Change filters

You probably know that clothes drying machines have filters that must be changed. However, other appliances like dishwashers and ice makers can also have filters. Read your appliance’s manual to see if your product has a filter, and if so, how often it needs to be changed.

home appllience

Overstock Appliances in Johns Island

Much like our scratch and dent merchandise, overstock appliances have become incredibly popular in recent times. While many savvy shoppers already know about the deals associated with overstock items, others hear “overstock appliances” and immediately think something is wrong. Nothing could be further from the truth!

There’s a simple explanation for overstock appliances in South Carolina, and it’s right in the name. Overstock items are products that manufacturers have made too many of or have a surplus of stock that needs to be sold. This is great news for shoppers who can get new, brand-name appliances at a fraction of their original cost.

There are many reasons why a manufacturer might need to sell their merchandise as overstock:

  • A retail store closes its doors, and its appliances and other stock must be liquidated
  • A retail store has an item that doesn’t sell as well as they had hoped
  • The manufacturer or their partners overestimated the amount of stock that they needed

While overstock items are perfectly normal, some customers think they aren’t worth purchasing because of a perceived “expiration date.” The fact is, overstock and surplus appliances are common in every industry because inventory management isn’t an easy job. Sometimes people make errors, but those mistakes can turn into amazing opportunities for high-quality appliances at great prices.

Overstock Appliances Explained

Retailers have to deal with surplus merchandise all the time because older stock must be removed to make room for newer appliances. When a retailer has a surplus of a particular appliance, they will typically reach out to the manufacturer to see if they can return their overstocked appliances. Because these manufacturers charge retailers to restock these surplus items, many retailers choose instead to off-load their stock at a discounted price, and that’s where Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair steps in.

The bottom line? Overstock appliances in Johns Island are common, brand new, and waiting for you to check out at our showroom. We carry all the major appliance brand names, like Whirlpool, LG, Bosch, Maytag, Kenmore, and even Samsung. Unlike our scratch and dent products, you aren’t going to find any minor dings or scratches on our overstock appliances. It sounds too good to be true, but it isn’t – when manufacturers make too much, you’re in luck.

At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we have a vast selection of overstock appliances for you to choose from, including:

  • Microwaves
  • Washers
  • Dryers
  • Refrigerators
  • Stoves
  • TVs
  • Dishwashers
  • Much More!
Overstock Appliances-Explained
Help Save the Environment

Buy Scratch And Dent Appliances, Help Save The Environment

Buying overstock or scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina is not just a way to get a great deal on a name-brand product – it’s also a great way to help protect our environment. As you might have guessed, unused scratch and dent merchandise usually end up in a landfill to sit and rot. When these appliances are brought to landfills, they release toxic greenhouse gases and harmful substances as their chemical and metal composition deteriorate.

When you buy a scratch and dent appliance from Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, know that you are doing your part to help protect our environment. When you break it down, buying products and appliances that would otherwise go to a landfill is a win-win. You’re getting an incredible discount on a high-quality appliance and you’re diminishing the harmful greenhouse gases that harm our precious environment.

The Premier Provider of Overstock and Scratch and Dent Appliances in Johns Island

If you’re still on the fence about giving scratch and dent products a chance, we encourage you to visit our discount appliance store in Johns Island. We have a full selection of appliances for you to see, like refrigerators, washing machines, dishwashers, and microwaves. If you’re looking for it, chances are we have it in stock!

If you have questions or need assistance choosing the right appliance for your home and budget, we’re here to help however possible. Whether you need a detailed rundown of how an appliance works or would like to hear more information about our easy financing options, our team will take the time to answer your questions.

charleston

At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, our customers always come first!

Latest News in Johns Island

Commentary: Make I-526 from Johns to James island a buses-only highway

The S.C. Department of Transportation has released detailed information about the planned Interstate 526 extension, and everybody who wants to be in the discussion should first study it. When I learned that Johns Island is expected to triple its population between 2015 and 2050, my initially favorable view of this project changed.The highway extension by itself is only a partial solution. Once built, it would trigger the widening of roads all over the area. The monetary and environmental costs of those roads appear nowhere in the othe...

The S.C. Department of Transportation has released detailed information about the planned Interstate 526 extension, and everybody who wants to be in the discussion should first study it. When I learned that Johns Island is expected to triple its population between 2015 and 2050, my initially favorable view of this project changed.

The highway extension by itself is only a partial solution. Once built, it would trigger the widening of roads all over the area. The monetary and environmental costs of those roads appear nowhere in the otherwise diligent impact study. We have arrived at a waypoint where we must question uncontrolled growth based on car traffic and become serious about public transportation.

The region has made a promising start with the Lowcountry Rapid Transit project. However, the low densities on James and Johns islands call for a different concept: multiple lines of smaller buses branching out into these islands. But how can these buses get there without being stuck in car traffic? The I-526 extension presents a one-time chance to achieve this through these steps:

• Build the I-526 extension as proposed in Alternative G with four lanes between West Ashley and Johns Island. This section of the highway is badly needed to connect Johns Island with destinations north and would reduce congestion on Main Road and Maybank Highway on James Island.

• Continue the extension to James Island and S.C. 30 as a two-lane bus road, accompanied by a bike and pedestrian path. If this section is built for car traffic, it will have a disproportionate impact on neighborhoods and the James Island County Park while bringing ever more cars into the city where parking is already scarce. As a green corridor, serving electric buses and bikers, it would be quiet and improve access to the park.

• Make future development on the islands conditional on improving bus service. Establish small park-and-ride lots where the bus lines connect to developments. As bus traffic increases, reserve two lanes on I-526 and S.C. 30 for “green” traffic.

In its study for the I-526 extension, the Department of Transportation does not mention buses or public transportation. This is the mindset of the 1970s, when road planning destroyed the urban fabric of cities and made them dependent on individual car traffic.

Perpetuated today, it is an astonishing denial of the challenges that are posed by climate change. It also constitutes social injustice toward residents on the islands who cannot drive cars because of their age or lack of monetary means.

Electric cars will not reduce congestion. Autonomous cars will increase demand and make it much worse. Future development on the islands is acceptable only if a significant amount of commuting can be served by public transportation. The I-526 extension offers a unique chance to do so.

Reinhold Roedig of Wadmalaw Island is a retired city planner from Germany who specialized in urban renewal.

Groups at odds over controversial proposal to ‘reimagine’ Charleston County schools

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – The Coastal Community Foundation’s (CCF) ‘Reimagine Schools’ proposal has many Charleston County parents, staff, and community groups on high alert.According to CCF’s website, the plan would “create three inclusive community commissions that will determine turnaround plans for many of the underperforming schools in their communities located in the most economically challenged areas of the school district.”The proposal targets over 20 schools in Downtown Charles...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – The Coastal Community Foundation’s (CCF) ‘Reimagine Schools’ proposal has many Charleston County parents, staff, and community groups on high alert.

According to CCF’s website, the plan would “create three inclusive community commissions that will determine turnaround plans for many of the underperforming schools in their communities located in the most economically challenged areas of the school district.”

The proposal targets over 20 schools in Downtown Charleston, North Charleston, Hollywood, Ravenel, and John’s Island with student populations made up predominately of minorities.

Two recent meetings led the CEO of CCF, Darrin Goss, to address community concerns and principles of the schools in question.

The concerns being raised include claims that CCF has little to no prior experience with school operations. Another is why CCSD would choose to utilize an outside party instead of funneling the money directly into the schools in need. A third concern stated by parents is why the district isn’t able to provide an equal education to all students.

“What this is trying to do is at first to give parents and those who are most affected by the schools the opportunity to reshape those schools. To envision for themselves and their students, what’s the best possible way to educate our children,” said Goss.Community organizations including Stand as One and the Lowcountry Black Parents Association are opposing the vote.

The following is a statement from Stand as One:

“The community is concerned with the vague details in the Reimagine Schools Proposal as well as the lack of transparency to the community. The $32 million privatization proposal for “change management” of 23 CCSD schools was presented to the school board four days before winter break and without any public input. This third-party-operator privatization push is not supported by the community or by any evidence of successful school reform. The vague and incomplete proposal is yet another disruptive experimentation on predominantly black and brown communities. Turning public schools over to redundant, appointed commissions and private organizations is blatant obstruction of fair representation and a waste of resources that should be directed into classrooms. By granting appointed commissions the power to make governance and operational decisions for individual schools, the initiative would take away school ownership from school-level staff and families. The school board plans to vote on this sweeping proposal during a time of leadership instability. In addition to questions about the future of the superintendent position. Ms. Fraizer’s interactions with Coastal Community Foundation’s proposal without alerting any of her elected district brings great concerns. We believe this is why she insisted the vote happened on December 13th. So things would be in place before the community had a chance to challenge it. Politicians are supposed to represent the will of the people and not their own personal intentions. The week before a vote is not enough time to suddenly want the community concerns or convince them this proposal has substance to benefit their community. For all of these reasons, this ill-conceived proposal should be rejected. CCSD should invest all $32 million directly into our schools.”

A press conference will take place Friday January 7th to encourage parents to make their voices heard as well as ask CCSD board members to vote ‘no.

The vote is set for January 10th.

This is a developing story, Check back for updates.

Town of James Island to request $6.4M in state, federal funds to stem creek contamination

JAMES ISLAND (WCSC) – The Town of James Island will be requesting millions of dollars in state and federal grants to fund a project designed to make a local creek safer to swim.Dave Schaeffer, the James Island Public Service District’s district manager, discussed the grants, which would allow over 200 properties near the creek to switch from septic tanks to water and sewer lines, during a meeting of the James Island Creek Task Force, Thursday afternoon.“Right now, as what we’re seeking, there would not b...

JAMES ISLAND (WCSC) – The Town of James Island will be requesting millions of dollars in state and federal grants to fund a project designed to make a local creek safer to swim.

Dave Schaeffer, the James Island Public Service District’s district manager, discussed the grants, which would allow over 200 properties near the creek to switch from septic tanks to water and sewer lines, during a meeting of the James Island Creek Task Force, Thursday afternoon.

“Right now, as what we’re seeking, there would not be out of pocket tap fees and connection fees, impact fees to the residents,” Schaeffer said.

The town said they will be requesting $6.4 million in federal and state funding to help make the project happen. In addition to the requested money, Schaeffer said the town will commit $1.8 million from American Rescue Plan funds that the town had received.

The James Island Creek Task Force consists of members from the City of Charleston, James Island and Charleston County.

Charleston Waterkeeper Executive Director Andrew Wunderley, who is part of the task force, said the group was formed in 2020 to find ways to clean up the creek and make it safe for swimming.

“Right now, we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to get this right with the American Rescue Act funding that’s coming to the state of South Carolina and is specifically earmarked for projects like this that are tied to public health and are tied to water and sewer upgrades,” Wunderley said.

Fred Schuh has lived alongside the James Island Creek for 20 years. He said he uses the creek regularly with his grandchildren and wants the septic tanks in the area removed to better the community’s health.

“It is concerning,” Schuh said. “Except for people who take an interest in testing it, we would not know there’s anything changed about it, but when there’s scientific studies done to show that there’s a problem, we need to pay attention to it.”

As a possible solution, Schuh also suggested that septic tanks should be inspected more frequently, so property owners could know when to repair their tanks.

However, for now, he said he supports the town requesting the funds to help solve the problem.

“If we could make the public aware of this and ask whatever funds possible be diverted to this extremely useful endeavor, I say I’m all for it,” Schuh said.

Schaeffer said during the meeting that he hopes the project gets funded when the money from the federal government begins being distributed in January or February.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Johns Island residents concerned about possible medical village

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Johns Island residents have concerns about a proposed Medical Village on Betsy Kerrison Parkway.Plans were presented at a Charleston County workshop last week, but no formal plans have been submitted to planning yet.The conceptual planned Island Park Place Medical Health and Wellness Village is proposed to be built along Betsy Kerrison Parkway, right across from Rosebank Farms.Plan from DesignWorks show it intends to offer a village-like setting with healthcare and wellness services.The...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Johns Island residents have concerns about a proposed Medical Village on Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

Plans were presented at a Charleston County workshop last week, but no formal plans have been submitted to planning yet.

The conceptual planned Island Park Place Medical Health and Wellness Village is proposed to be built along Betsy Kerrison Parkway, right across from Rosebank Farms.

Plan from DesignWorks show it intends to offer a village-like setting with healthcare and wellness services.

The conceptual plans for the Island Park Place show a 40,000-square-foot Main Medical Facility along with other practices throughout the village like physical therapy, pain management, women’s wellness, chiropractic’s, orthopedics, dentistry, family medicine, cardiology, nutrition, life fitness, pharmacy, health grocery and eateries.

James Stanton lives a few miles from the proposed location. He says he’s in favor of having more medical facilities in this area of Johns Island, but has concerns about the exact site.

“Myself, many of our neighbors, we’re very pro-development and understand where the infrastructure needs to be improved,” Stanton said. “We just want it to be done in a smart way.”

Other people like Rich Thomas, who lives right across from the potential medical village, are worried the medical village would change the character of Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

He feels areas like Freshfield Village or Maybank Highway would be better suited for this type of development.

“Part of the road, about half of it, directly across the road from here is swampy, wetlands,” Thomas said. “So that land would have to be filled in to build a proposed development. Doing that would cause the run-off to go around and back across my property actually if you look at the flow path.”

The workshop meeting last week was the first step for the developer to introduce the planned development.

However, in order for it to ever come, the site would first need to be rezoned to a planned development (PD) through Charleston County Zoning and Planning. The current zoning of the property does not allow the proposed use.

As of now, Charleston County Zoning and Planning Department says they do not have a formal application. Therefore, it is not currently scheduled for any upcoming Planning Commission meetings.

“There’s a feeling around here at times that things just get done in the dead of night,” Thomas said.

He says he hopes there’s a strong public/private conversation if this medical village moves forward in the future.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Commentary: How Oakville success helps preserve Johns Island’s rural heritage

Traveling along Maybank Highway on Johns Island may evoke the sense that rampant development has overrun this storied sea island. But a short detour along River Road or Bohicket Road gives a completely different impression. It quickly becomes obvious that Johns Island is still a place rich with culture and history — with rural communities, farms and forests, and oak-canopied byways all serving as powerful testament to the persistence of a unique people and a beautiful working landscape.In fact, about 80% of Johns Island is still...

Traveling along Maybank Highway on Johns Island may evoke the sense that rampant development has overrun this storied sea island. But a short detour along River Road or Bohicket Road gives a completely different impression. It quickly becomes obvious that Johns Island is still a place rich with culture and history — with rural communities, farms and forests, and oak-canopied byways all serving as powerful testament to the persistence of a unique people and a beautiful working landscape.

In fact, about 80% of Johns Island is still rural. It is this Johns Island that constitutes the vast majority of the island’s acreage, and that holds the promise of a rural heritage that will endure into the future.

There is a reason most of the island remains rural. In 2000, Charleston County enacted agricultural zoning on large farm and forest properties below Plow Ground Road and thus protected about half of the acreage from suburban development. This new zoning also stabilized the traditional African American settlement communities. Finally, in part due to funds made available by the Charleston County Greenbelt Program, 3,365 acres have been protected.

But this future is only partially secure. Zoning can be changed. Urban infrastructure driving suburban sprawl development can be extended. Despite more than two decades of hard work by the county, Johns Island landowners and the local community, the landscape could be lost in the blink of an eye. Now, however, thanks to an inspiring partnership between commerce, conservation, the city of Charleston, the S.C. Conservation Bank and Charleston County, the future of Johns Island looks increasingly bright.

To appreciate this latest conservation accomplishment-in-the-making, it is important to understand that the greatest risk to rural Johns Island is the conversion of land along the Urban Growth Boundary, adjacent to the Charleston Executive Airport. Here, a parcel called Oakville was marked for development.

Although this 95-acre property is on the “growth” side of the boundary, it is totally unsuited for development. Positioned at the mouth of Burden Creek, the entire parcel is only a few feet above sea level. Despite extensive discussion about the perils of developing flood-prone areas and vocal community opposition, outdated zoning laws allowed for the construction of 200 to 400 houses.

Additionally, the parcel’s location adjacent to the airport increased the risk of fatal plane accidents. Further, undoubtedly residents would be consistently disturbed by low-flying planes, creating an inevitable conflict between homeowners and the airport.

It was this concern that the conservation partners brought to the Charleston County Aviation Authority. The partners — including the Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, the Coastal Conservation League, the Johns Island Task Force, the Lowcountry Land Trust and the Open Space Institute — found common interest with the Aviation Authority in protecting Oakville from development.

The Aviation Authority recognized the critical importance of ensuring safety for future airport activity, along with the additional resilience benefit — in keeping with the Dutch Dialogues recommendations — of avoiding development on low-lying land. Further, conserving the open space along the edge of the Urban Growth Boundary helps stabilize traditional rural communities by preventing suburban sprawl and the associated increase in taxes and service fees. This unique partnership culminated in the Aviation Authority purchasing Oakville in late July for $7.7 million.

With Oakville out of the developer’s hands, the last step in the process is ensuring the property’s permanent protection. To that end, the S.C. Conservation Bank recently voted to help fund the purchase of a conservation easement. And on Tuesday, Charleston City Council unanimously voted to support funding the project through the Charleston County Greenbelt Program in its upcoming cycle.

Once completed, Oakville will be a great achievement and the first step toward establishing a permanent greenbelt on Johns Island. It illustrates what can be done when a wide array of community members, organizations and public entities work together toward a common future. This is important because much land still remains to be preserved on Johns Island. It will take hard work over the coming years, but we should all take heart that we have the institutions, the financial resources and, most importantly, the people to rise to the challenge.

Michelle Sinkler is the special projects manager with the Open Space Institute. This column was submitted by the institute, the Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, the Coastal Conservation League, the Johns Island Task Force and the Lowcountry Land Trust.

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