Scratch and Dent

Appliances in Moncks Corner

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843-970-8033 1992 Old Trolley Rd. Summerville, SC 29485

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Your First Choice for Scratch and Dent Appliances in Moncks Corner

In a day and age where big box stores sell overpriced appliances to hardworking men and women, droves of Americans are flocking to scratch and dent retailers. At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we understand that money doesn’t grow on trees. That’s why we offer our customers the largest selection of overstock and scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina.

Finding a reputable, clean discount appliance store can be challenging. Unfortunately, companies in our industry get a bad rap. Sometimes, they earn it with dingy, poorly-lit stores, empty shelves, and mediocre customer service. At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we are proud to give our customers the “big box” structure of major chains mixed with personable service and affordable pricing of a discount appliance business. Our store is clean, our shelves are stocked, and our staff is ready and waiting to exceed your expectations.

The surge in popularity of scratch and dent appliances might be new, but we are far from a “fly by night” appliance store. As a locally owned and operated appliance store, we have worked very hard to build trust with our customers. We have years of experience selling quality scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina, from washers and dryers to outdoor grills and everything in between. Whether you know the exact brand and appliance you’re looking for or need the assistance of a friendly sales associate, we are here to make your shopping experience seamless and enjoyable!

Customers love Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair because:

  • All of our scratch and dent or overstock appliances are in great condition, giving you years of reliable use
  • We only sell the best name brand scratch and dent appliances
  • We offer a one-year warranty on many products
  • We have the most competitive prices in South Carolina
  • Our customers always come first!

When you visit our showroom, you will see a large selection of the following products:

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Scratch and Dent Appliances

Ask yourself this: Why should you pay top-dollar prices for brand new “in the box” appliances when you can have them out of the box with the same warranty for a significant amount less? When you begin to think about buying scratch and dent appliances in Moncks Corner, it begins to make all the sense in the world.

Don’t let the term “scratch and dent” scare you – all of our appliances are high-quality, name-brand products that are in great condition. You won’t ever have to worry about an inoperable oven or a faulty dryer when you shop at Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair. Our appliances are all unused and shipped to use straight off the assembly line. That’s right – you’re paying bottom-of-the-barrel prices for brand new products that your family and friends will love.

You might be asking yourself, “What’s the catch?” It might sound too good to be true, but there isn’t any catch. Our scratch and dent appliances are sold at deep discounts because a minor cosmetic issue developed somewhere along the line. A few common reasons why appliances are labeled as scratch and dent include:

  • The product’s external packaging was slightly damaged
  • The product has a small scratch that is barely visible
  • The product has a slight dent that is hard to see
  • The product has a tiny “ding” from being moved around in the warehouse
Service Areas

Unlike some of our competitors, our skilled technicians perform rigorous multi-point examinations on all our appliances. That way, you can rest easy knowing that your out-of-the-box appliance is ready for regular use as soon as it arrives at your home. With a one-year warranty on most scratch and dent items, our customers leave our showroom with a smile on their face knowing their purchase is protected.

And that, in a nutshell, is the Preferred Appliance Sales and Repairs difference: quality appliances, helpful customer service, and real warranties that you can feel good about.

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Scratch and Dent Appliances – Are They Right for You?

Here’s the truth: Nobody wants an old, beat-up appliance with huge dents and scratches. Fortunately, we’re not talking about a banged-up dishwasher that barely works. Scratch and dent appliances are just like brand new, except they have a small nick that’s barely noticeable. The question is, are you OK with a small dent if it means you could save 25% off your purchase? What about 50% off? If you were to do a Google search on a name-brand appliance and compare its price to the same item in our showroom, you would see just how cost-effective scratch and dent shopping can be.

The majority of our customers are savvy shoppers who don’t mind tiny imperfections if it means that they will get a great deal. In many cases, these imperfections are paint-based, which are easily fixed with a little elbow grease. If you’re in the market for a fully functional, nearly-new appliance and don’t mind a small blemish, buying scratch and dent appliances is a great choice that won’t break your bank.

Scratch and Dent Quick Facts

  • Scratch and dent doesn’t mean “damaged.” You could save as much as 50% or more off brand new appliances with minor scrapes or dents.
  • We have a huge selection of scratch and dent appliances for sale, including washing machines, dryers, refrigerators, stoves, and much more.
  • Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair offers customers all major name brands in our industry, including Samsung, LG, Whirlpool, Kenmore, Speed Queen, Maytag, Bosch, Frigidaire, and more.
  • Each of our scratch and dent appliances is examined before you buy to ensure they work properly.
  • We offer customers a one-year warranty on most scratch and dent appliances in Moncks Corner, so you can shop with confidence.
  • There is no credit needed to make a purchase at Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair. In fact, we offer up to $5,000 in approvals and can make arrangements for 90-day payment options.
  • We offer appliance delivery and repair options. We only charge $99 for in-home service calls!
Scratch and Dent Quick Facts

How to Get the Most Out of Your Scratch and Dent Appliances

Appliances can be a big investment, even if you’re buying them at significant discounts. Of course, you want to keep your appliances in
good shape, so they continue working properly for years. Once you buy one of our scratch and dent appliances, keep in mind these tips
to keep your new merchandise in great working order:

Clean Inside and Out

All appliances need to be cleaned, even washing machines. As an example, cleaning the coils of your new scratch and dent refrigerator will keep it running efficiently.

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Only Use Appliances as They Were Intended

If your kids love to play near your appliances, be sure they aren’t standing or sitting on them. If you’re using a scratch and dent dishwasher or clothes dryer, don’t overload them. If your appliance requires specific products, like a high-efficiency laundry detergent, only use the recommended products.

Change filters

You probably know that clothes drying machines have filters that must be changed. However, other appliances like dishwashers and ice makers can also have filters. Read your appliance’s manual to see if your product has a filter, and if so, how often it needs to be changed.

home appllience

Overstock Appliances in Moncks Corner

Much like our scratch and dent merchandise, overstock appliances have become incredibly popular in recent times. While many savvy shoppers already know about the deals associated with overstock items, others hear “overstock appliances” and immediately think something is wrong. Nothing could be further from the truth!

There’s a simple explanation for overstock appliances in South Carolina, and it’s right in the name. Overstock items are products that manufacturers have made too many of or have a surplus of stock that needs to be sold. This is great news for shoppers who can get new, brand-name appliances at a fraction of their original cost.

There are many reasons why a manufacturer might need to sell their merchandise as overstock:

  • A retail store closes its doors, and its appliances and other stock must be liquidated
  • A retail store has an item that doesn’t sell as well as they had hoped
  • The manufacturer or their partners overestimated the amount of stock that they needed

While overstock items are perfectly normal, some customers think they aren’t worth purchasing because of a perceived “expiration date.” The fact is, overstock and surplus appliances are common in every industry because inventory management isn’t an easy job. Sometimes people make errors, but those mistakes can turn into amazing opportunities for high-quality appliances at great prices.

Overstock Appliances Explained

Retailers have to deal with surplus merchandise all the time because older stock must be removed to make room for newer appliances. When a retailer has a surplus of a particular appliance, they will typically reach out to the manufacturer to see if they can return their overstocked appliances. Because these manufacturers charge retailers to restock these surplus items, many retailers choose instead to off-load their stock at a discounted price, and that’s where Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair steps in.

The bottom line? Overstock appliances in Moncks Corner are common, brand new, and waiting for you to check out at our showroom. We carry all the major appliance brand names, like Whirlpool, LG, Bosch, Maytag, Kenmore, and even Samsung. Unlike our scratch and dent products, you aren’t going to find any minor dings or scratches on our overstock appliances. It sounds too good to be true, but it isn’t – when manufacturers make too much, you’re in luck.

At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, we have a vast selection of overstock appliances for you to choose from, including:

  • Microwaves
  • Washers
  • Dryers
  • Refrigerators
  • Stoves
  • TVs
  • Dishwashers
  • Much More!
Overstock Appliances-Explained
Help Save the Environment

Buy Scratch And Dent Appliances, Help Save The Environment

Buying overstock or scratch and dent appliances in South Carolina is not just a way to get a great deal on a name-brand product – it’s also a great way to help protect our environment. As you might have guessed, unused scratch and dent merchandise usually end up in a landfill to sit and rot. When these appliances are brought to landfills, they release toxic greenhouse gases and harmful substances as their chemical and metal composition deteriorate.

When you buy a scratch and dent appliance from Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, know that you are doing your part to help protect our environment. When you break it down, buying products and appliances that would otherwise go to a landfill is a win-win. You’re getting an incredible discount on a high-quality appliance and you’re diminishing the harmful greenhouse gases that harm our precious environment.

The Premier Provider of Overstock and Scratch and Dent Appliances in Moncks Corner

If you’re still on the fence about giving scratch and dent products a chance, we encourage you to visit our discount appliance store in Moncks Corner. We have a full selection of appliances for you to see, like refrigerators, washing machines, dishwashers, and microwaves. If you’re looking for it, chances are we have it in stock!

If you have questions or need assistance choosing the right appliance for your home and budget, we’re here to help however possible. Whether you need a detailed rundown of how an appliance works or would like to hear more information about our easy financing options, our team will take the time to answer your questions.

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At Preferred Appliance Sales and Repair, our customers always come first!

Latest News in Moncks Corner

Editorial: Moncks Corner has a chance to stay a step ahead of growth — if it acts now

As the Charleston metro region spreads westward along Interstate 26 and northward along U.S. Highway 52, Moncks Corner can expect to experience growth pressures like never before. The good news is there’s still time for the town to plan for how to handle it.One promising step is the U.S. 52 Corridor Study begun by the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, which ultimately will create a blueprint for what kind of traffic improvements, parks, new development and safety upgrades should be made along the 18-mile-lon...

As the Charleston metro region spreads westward along Interstate 26 and northward along U.S. Highway 52, Moncks Corner can expect to experience growth pressures like never before. The good news is there’s still time for the town to plan for how to handle it.

One promising step is the U.S. 52 Corridor Study begun by the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, which ultimately will create a blueprint for what kind of traffic improvements, parks, new development and safety upgrades should be made along the 18-mile-long artery linking Moncks Corner and Goose Creek.

The study could even lay the groundwork for a new bus rapid transit line that would link up to the one already being planned between the Ladson fairgrounds and downtown Charleston. (The two lines could join at U.S. Highways 52 and 78.) We urge Moncks Corner residents and all those interested in the future of this highway to take the online survey available until Jan. 14 at bcdcog.com/us-52-corridor-study/.

And they should continue to pay attention throughout the coming year, as the planners define different land-use scenarios, analyze those scenarios’ impact on traffic and the environment and then recommend a vision for the corridor’s future.

Meanwhile, the town also has begun a major revision to its comprehensive plan, and public meetings are expected to be scheduled soon. The timing is fortuitous as Berkeley County and Goose Creek have completed or nearly completed their own planning updates. For the first time, Moncks Corner’s comprehensive plan may look at what land uses are desired in certain parts of town rather than simply matching its land-use vision to the existing zoning.

This planning effort will give residents an important chance to weigh in on what type of growth they want to see in which parts of town. Such a discussion is timely. Moncks Corner saw a heated debate over a developer’s recent attempt to annex Gippy Plantation into the town for denser residential development. The town said no, but the property’s future remains uncertain.

We hope residents use the comp plan to bolster efforts to revive Moncks Corner’s downtown. Five years ago, the town’s first downtown plan led to new branding as the “Lowcountry’s Hometown,” a new flag and aesthetic improvements, but more can be done to encourage desired commercial development, such as a small hotel, and to upgrade the public realm.

“We all understand that we’ve got one chance to build this town correctly,” Community Development Director Doug Polen says. “It’s really hard to redevelop, and there’s so much growth potential. We know people are coming. We know people are going to build houses. We want people to build commercial to support those houses.”

As growth continues to push farther into once-quiet sections of the tri-county area, it brings both prosperity and challenges. Moncks Corner’s population has grown more than 30% since 2010, and the Volvo plant and other industrial operations emerging along I-26 — along with the town’s more affordable housing prices and surrounding natural beauty — are expected to continue to make it an attractive destination.

But to maintain the region’s quality of life and the town’s appeal, it might make sense to view Moncks Corner as a stopping place for the region’s growth, an idea that would help protect the historic rural and environmentally sensitive area to the east, including the Francis Marion National Forest. These are also lands valued as fishing and hunting grounds.

Accommodating new development while protecting what town residents value will be the challenge.

Post and Courier reporter Jerrell Floyd provided a slice of what they cherish about small-town life in his account of the Moncks Corner’s Christmas tree lighting on Main Street.

“Everybody kind of knows everybody,” Virginia Woolverton told Mr. Floyd as a loud train passed nearby.

The coming growth is expected to be a lot like that train: powerful, predictable and potentially disruptive. The town and those who love it must engage now to ensure it’s on the right track.

Basketball roundup: Berkeley girls, Goose Creek boys win region openers

The curtains came up on the Region 7-AAAAA basketball slate on Jan. 11.Goose Creek made the trip up Highway 52 to Moncks Corner to tangle with Berkeley and Cane Bay welcomed Wando into the snake pit.The girls teams from Cane Bay and Berkeley started off 1-0 while Goose Creek’s boys and Wando’s boys also sparked the region slate with a victory celebration.Berkeley’s girls pull out a 39-33 win against the Gators, getting a game-high 26 points from forward Peighton Jambor. Nakeshia Jerideau and Amani McCra...

The curtains came up on the Region 7-AAAAA basketball slate on Jan. 11.

Goose Creek made the trip up Highway 52 to Moncks Corner to tangle with Berkeley and Cane Bay welcomed Wando into the snake pit.

The girls teams from Cane Bay and Berkeley started off 1-0 while Goose Creek’s boys and Wando’s boys also sparked the region slate with a victory celebration.

Berkeley’s girls pull out a 39-33 win against the Gators, getting a game-high 26 points from forward Peighton Jambor. Nakeshia Jerideau and Amani McCray chipped in four points apiece for coach Crystal Peace’s squad.

Peace said she was pleased with the efforts of young point guard Saniya Sanders and her ability to communicate with her teammates on the floor. She also said the Stags have to get better moving forward to compete in what figures to a tough journey through the region schedule.

Goose Creek’s girls were paced by Samiya Grant and Ravin Griffin with 17 and 10 points, respectively.

Berkeley led by four at the break and went on to lead by as many as 12 points. Goose Creek closed within six points in the final period.

“There are a lot of things we have to work on,” Goose Creek coach Tim Baldwin said. “The thing I like is the two seniors are starting to lead a little bit. We’re dealing with a lot of kids who don’t have a lot of varsity experience. We’re going to be learning on the fly but I really like the girls. They don’t mind working hard.”

In the boys game, Goose Creek built a 19-2 lead in the first quarter and coasted to a 70-36 victory.

Britt led the Gators boys with a game-high 20 points while Elijah Dates and Daunte Taylor added double digits, too, scoring 12 and 10 respectively. Shane Potts chipped in nine points.

Damon Brown paced Berkeley with 12 points while Troy Reid contributed nine points. Josh Youngblood chipped in six points.

Cane Bay’s girls improved to 13-3 with a 46-24 win over Wando. Cobras guard Alaina Nettles led all scorers with 23 points and Jasmine Jenkins added 10 points. Tatum Carr chipped in four points.

“They’ve been playing well pretty much all season,” Cane Bay girls coach Ira Owens said. “The thing we’ve done better here lately is getting off to a more consistent start. We had a couple games before Christmas we lost because we had poor-shooting first halves.”

The Cobras built a 10-point halftime lead and pulled away in the second half, outscoring the Warriors 23-11 in the second half.

The win was the fifth straight for Cane Bay’s girls and set a new high mark for wins in a season for the Cobras, who began playing in 2008-09.

In the boys game, Wando scored the final five points to edge the Cobras, 55-54. The Warriors overcame an 11-point deficit to start the region off on the right foot.

Stratford had the night off on Jan. 11 but is slated to travel to Cane Bay on Jan. 14.

Cane Bay’s boys fell to 12-6.

Faith Christian 72,

Northside Christian 41

Faith Christian’s boys won their sixth straight game and improved to 9-3 on the season.

Battery Creek 53,

Hanahan 47

The Hanahan boys basketball team fell to Battery Creek in overtime on Jan. 11.

Keith Bryant and Dru Goldsmith led the Hawks with 15 and 11 points, respectively. Malik Horry chipped in nine points and Kit Cooper eight points.

Palmetto Christian 65,

St. John’s Christian 60

St. John’s Christian boys lost to visiting Palmetto Christian on Jan. 11.

Wallace Hester poured in 30 points for the Cavaliers and Brock Ray added seven points.

The St. John’s Christian girls also lost a close game, falling 49-44 to the Lowcountry Wildcats.

Meeting Notes - January 13, 2022

Here are upcoming development plans before the City of Charleston and results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.Date: Jan. 13• Site plan for Project Throughput at Charleston Regional Parkway on Cainhoy (fourth review). This is an early site work plan for 172 acres for a new container handling and storage facility. The owner is South Carolina Ports Authority. The a...

Here are upcoming development plans before the City of Charleston and results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.

Date: Jan. 13

• Site plan for Project Throughput at Charleston Regional Parkway on Cainhoy (fourth review). This is an early site work plan for 172 acres for a new container handling and storage facility. The owner is South Carolina Ports Authority. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Scott Greene, greene.s@tandh.com.

• A site plan for Southern Eagle Expansion at 1600 Charleston Regional Parkway in Cainhoy (first review). This is a 4.2-acre site plan for a warehouse expansion and construction of expanded truck court, trailer parking areas, and existing utility relocation. The owner is Southern Eagle Distributing. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Scott Greene, greene.s@tandh.com.

Date: Jan. 6

• A preliminary subdivision plat for Cainhoy Del Webb Phase 1 at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road (first review). The site is a 160.9-acre plat for a major subdivision that would include 164 lots for single family residential development. The owner is Plute Home Company, LLC. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, cox.w@tandh.com. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

• Road construction plans for Cainhoy Del Webb Phase 1 at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road (first review). The site is a 160.9-acre plat for road construction plans that would include 164 lots for single family residential development. The owner is Plute Home Company, LLC. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, cox.w@tandh.com. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

• Road construction plans for the Marshes at Daniel Island Phases 1A & 1B for a major subdivision at 144 Fairbanks Drive on Daniel Island (eighth review). This is a 16.78-acre plat for road construction plans on a 56-lot subdivision. The owner is SM Charleston, LLC. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Zim Fant, zfant@seamonwhiteside.com. Results: Approval pending final documentation. Submit plans to engineering for stamping.

• A site plan for Woodfield Cooper River Farms II at Enterprise Boulevard on Cainhoy (pre-application). This is a 2.7-acre plat for a 71 multifamily unit development. The owner is Woodfield Acquisitions. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Hampton Young, hyoung@seamonwhiteside.com. Results: Submit to TRC for first review.

• Berkeley County Council meets on the fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Berkeley County Administration Building, 1003 Highway 52, Moncks Corner.

• Berkeley County Board of Education meetings are held twice each month. Executive Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.; meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

• Charleston City Council conducts its meetings on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 5 p.m.

New Moncks Corner project part of first phase of Liberty Trail in South Carolina

MONCKS CORNER — Here, nestled among the trees near the headwaters of the Cooper River, the British army settled in for the long haul.The siege of Charleston was underway, and Loyalist forces during the spring of 1780 wanted a staging ground north of the city where they could regroup, strategize, care for the wounded, deploy troops and, if necessary, seek a secure retreat.Fair Lawn Plantation was perfect. It was a huge property owned by Peter Colleton, eldest son of John Colleton, one the original Lord Proprietors of the C...

MONCKS CORNER — Here, nestled among the trees near the headwaters of the Cooper River, the British army settled in for the long haul.

The siege of Charleston was underway, and Loyalist forces during the spring of 1780 wanted a staging ground north of the city where they could regroup, strategize, care for the wounded, deploy troops and, if necessary, seek a secure retreat.

Fair Lawn Plantation was perfect. It was a huge property owned by Peter Colleton, eldest son of John Colleton, one the original Lord Proprietors of the Carolina colony and a British sympathizer. The grand residence was fortified and a square earthen redoubt was constructed with the river on one side and an important crossroads on the other.

Fort Fair Lawn would guard Colleton Castle, which had been converted into a hospital and armory. It would protect British troop maneuvers and communication lines, and it would keep rebel Patriots at bay along Congaree Road and a coastal road. It would also assist with the siege, providing the British with a stronghold about 30 miles north of Charleston.

Today, the fort, likely constructed by enslaved people and low-ranking British functionaries, is remarkably intact and protected in perpetuity thanks to a years-long effort by the Lord Berkeley Conservation Trust. It will become part of a new public heritage site featuring nearly 2 miles of new trails, a pavilion, historic interpretation and access to Old Santee Canal Park and the Berkeley County Museum.

More than 30 forts were constructed during the American Revolutionary War in South Carolina. Only two remain in their original condition: the Ninety Six National Historic Site in Greenwood County and Fort Fair Lawn.

The site is one of five to be developed during the first phase of The Liberty Trail, a project spearheaded by the American Battlefield Trust with key support from the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust, an independent affiliate.

“We’re eager to get residents and visitors onsite to experience the history that shaped our nation’s independence,” Doug Bostick, executive director of the Battleground Preservation Trust, said in a statement.

The Liberty Trail eventually will connect and interpret 30 sites in South Carolina, from Charleston to Eutaw Springs to Hanging Rock and Waxhaws and beyond.

Fort Fair Lawn is part of a cluster of important Revolutionary War-era sites in Berkeley County that includes the former Mepkin Plantation (now an abbey), the Avenue of Cedars, Wadboo Bridge, the void that once was Colleton mansion and the ruins of Biggin Church.

Time and money

It took years, as it often does, to secure the land.

The Lord Berkeley Conservation Trust, which will turn 30 in 2022, is one of several land trusts active in the Lowcountry that, together, have protected 1 million acres of private holdings in South Carolina, about 5 percent of the entire state.

The Lord Berkeley Trust’s specific contribution, so far, is 41,000 acres, according to Executive Director Chris Vaughn. It has 10,000 more acres in the pipeline.

Land trusts typically negotiate with property owners who either transfer the deed as a result of a donation, or who agree to a conservation easement — a legally binding contract that forbids certain uses in perpetuity, including real estate development.

Conservation easements became the tool of choice in the 1990s when several environmental groups worked to protect the ACE Basin. That project has served as a model ever since.

The Lord Berkeley Trust set the gears turning to acquire the 80-acre Fort Fair Lawn tract in 2007 and obtained it, finally, in 2016. The surrounding area had been slated for a housing development, but those plans fell through, according to the trust’s former director, Raleigh West.

It took $1 million in funding from the South Carolina Conservation Bank, $500,000 in hydrology mitigation funding from the State Ports Authority, and $500,000 from the National Park Service’s American Battlefield Protection Program.

This is the first of its properties the trust will open to the public.

At first, the fort is difficult to discern among the verdant foliage. One steps across a tiny bridge that spans what appears to be a creek. It’s not a creek. It’s part of the moat that was 9 feet high, with 6 feet of water (enough to cover the heads of anyone who fell in).

Inside, careful to avoid snakes and nesting wasps, one can ascend a small mound — the remains of a cannon terreplein.

In the center of the fort are some loose bricks that once were part of a kiln the British used to forge weapons and ammunition. From this location the fort’s earthen walls, now eroded and overgrown mounds, are easier to see.

Beat the retreat

Fort Fair Lawn was manned by garrisons ordered to protect British interests, and to make it easier to move troops, said David Reuwer, who called it a key crossroads, a sort of “Union Station.”

It was a base from which the British lay siege on Charleston, and the place to which the British retreated after the bloody Battle of Eutaw Springs in September 1781, the last big confrontation of the Revolutionary War in the Carolinas.

By then, the British had been worn down by the guerrilla tactics of Brig. Gen. Francis Marion and other Patriots. To maintain their occupation of Charleston, the British resorted to launching raids in the countryside to forage for supplies, food and other useful materials. But the Americans often scuttled their efforts, or worse.

The occupation proved unsustainable, largely because of these constant skirmishes and battles.

The Fair Lawn staging ground was the British base during the Battle of Moncks Corner on April 14, 1780. Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton and his Loyalist fighters defeated S.C. Brig. Gen. Isaac Huger, consolidating British command over the area.

In the weeks following the Eutaw Springs confrontation, when British troops were recovering at Fair Lawn, Marion and Lt. Col. Henry “Light-Horse Harry” Lee, and Col. Wade Hampton harassed the post. On Nov. 17, 1781, Marion dispatched Col. Hezekiah Maham and Col. Isaac Shelby, each with around 200 men, to attack Fair Lawn.

The British, taken by surprise, did not resist as the Patriots took possession of weapons, supplies and about 150 prisoners. When the British evacuated later that month, they burned the buildings on the property.

Wadboo Swamp, Aug. 29, 1782, very near Fair Lawn, was the location of the last of the fighting in Berkeley County. On Dec. 14 that year, after 32 months of occupation, the British evacuated Charleston, and the war in the South drew to a close.

New houses soon will be constructed on a large tract near Fort Fair Lawn. Once they’re built, the fort, its trails and the Old Santee Canal Park will be largely surrounded.

But it could have been worse, with homes butting up against the fort and preventing its linkage to the park. Now, thanks to the efforts of the Lord Berkeley Conservation Trust and its several partners, future visitors to the site can admire the tactics and ingenuity of 18th century warfare and contemplate South Carolina’s contributions to the birth of the nation.

Moncks Corner to use COVID relief funds to support employees with one-time payment

MONCKS CORNER — Town Council has approved the use of federal COVID-19 relief funds to support its employees.Through the American Rescue Plan Act, Moncks Corner is slated to receive nearly $6 million. Congress passed the near $1.9 trillion bill in March as a way to help with the health and economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.Through the bill, states are receiving funding to support nonentitlement units of local government. These are local governments with populations under 50,000.While over the years Moncks Cor...

MONCKS CORNER — Town Council has approved the use of federal COVID-19 relief funds to support its employees.

Through the American Rescue Plan Act, Moncks Corner is slated to receive nearly $6 million. Congress passed the near $1.9 trillion bill in March as a way to help with the health and economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Through the bill, states are receiving funding to support nonentitlement units of local government. These are local governments with populations under 50,000.

While over the years Moncks Corner has grown, the town’s population is below 15,000.

At a Nov. 16 Town Council meeting, members voted and approved a resolution to use around $300,000 in its COVID-19 relief funds to support its essential workers with a one-time payment of $2,000 each.

“This is really, really good news,” Jeff Lord, town administrator, said during the meeting.

Moncks Corner is following the U.S. Treasury Department’s definition of an essential worker as “workers who have been and continue to be relied on to maintain a continuity of operations of critical infrastructure sectors.”

The payments will specifically go to Moncks Corner government employees who could not perform their jobs remotely from home.

In order to qualify for the payment, individuals have to be full-time employees with Moncks Corner town government who work an average of 40 hours per week.

If part-time, they have to work 20 to 30 hours a week. Elected officials and part-time employees who work less than 20 hours are excluded from receiving the payment.

Officials are still discussing uses for the remainder of the funds.

The town is mapping out how to use the funding to support ongoing infrastructure projects around Jolly Lane, Whitesville Road and a local stream called the California Branch.

Following routine flooding and concerns from residents, the town completed an engineering study on the California Branch. The study highlighted flood-mitigation improvement needs around Jolly Lane and Whitesville Road.

Some of the work includes increasing the size of pipes along the roads. The ultimate goal is to get the California Branch on the right track and avoid routine overflow.

“And it’s working,” said Moncks Corner Mayor Michael Lockliear.

Though funds from the American Rescue Plan are also an opportunity to help pay for broadband access, officials said in a Nov. 16 workshop that broadband access isn’t an issue in town.

According to Molly Willard, a town spokeswoman, Moncks Corner is expected to receive half of the COVID relief funds this year and the other half next year.

The Berkeley County School District is slated to receive $72 million in COVID relief funds. Berkeley County will be allocated more than $44 million.

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